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  1. Maybe. I dunno mate but I thought I'd shed some more light on this for any future references, and try to cut through the bullshit. I will be even more clear this time.... 1st / 2nd gear shift insert: In all the RB 5 speed gearboxes there is a solid type shifter insert on the 1st / 2nd synchro hub arrangement. There is 3 of them and they are a solid key design, which acts against 2 circular springs - one each side of these solid keys. This is the design on the 1st / 2nd synchro arrangement and never changed on any 5 speed Skyline R32 - R34 from 1989 - 2001 or R32 / R33 GTR box from 1989 - 1998. It looks like this and is the original part number 32609-30P00. 32609-23P00 is the new R33 alternative part number but still same thing. Both very much still available. Original 3rd / 4th shift insert (most common): Now the 3rd / 4th gear synchro hub arrangement used a different setup that did not use 3 solid shift inserts acting on opposing springs as mentioned above on the 1st / 2nd arrangement. Instead it used 3 spring steel inserts. As they are spring steel they provide the spring tension, and is a bit of a shit design as they are prone to losing their "springiness", fatiguing and breaking. Why Nissan decided on this design compared to the 1st / 2nd gear arrangement is beyond me, but it is the most common 3rd / 4th synchro setup and is all the 32 / 33 GTR / GTS boxes until 1997 when the series 3, 5 speed GTR revision took place. Again, it looks like this and is also still available - part number 32609-70L20. Revised 3rd / 4th shift insert: Now obviously Nissan finally decided that the above 3rd / 4th gear shift insert design was infact very shit and changed it. It was revised to be like the design of the 1st / 2nd gear arrangement, in that it went away from the spring steel clip type insert and went to 3 solid key insert with 2 opposing springs - the way it should've been in the first place. This is what is found in the R34 GTT and 97/98 R33 GTR 5 speed transmissions. The bad thing from an upgrade point of view is that everything relating to 3rd and 4th gear was also changed like the selector fork and synchro hub coupling, etc. Part number 32609-70L15, superseded by 32609-AA510 and both very much still available. Looks the same to the original 1st / 2nd insert doesn't it ? - it's not. Now if only you've got a keen eye you'll see the raised hump section is different. On the 1st / 2nd one it is substantially shorter in the middle than the much larger / longer revised 3rd / 4th insert. The overhead shots show the clear difference in the raised edge. Again, compare: 1st / 2nd insert Revised 3rd / 4th insert Now look at the opening dyl33 pics which has the much shorter raised centre section: Hence why I said originally from the 1st / 2nd assembly, as most Skyline boxes out there will still be running the spring clip 3rd / 4th inserts unless you a have an R34 GTT, 97/98 series 3 R33 GTR, a recently brand new complete 5 speed transmission or done a gearset upgrade as they all use the new 3rd / 4th synchro design. Hopefully this clarifies the differences with some pics showing a clear way to easily identify internally the early and late transmissions when disassembled.
    8 points
  2. Hey all. Been a very long time since I posted here but I wanted to share some info in case it is useful. I've learnt so much on SAU so I need to pay it back! I recently blew the motor in my R33 - not sure what happened, maybe just age and stress, but it exploded the piston and rod in cylinder 5 very good. In the process it also bent a valve and caused some other damage. In my situation, I decided I would just hunt down a long motor and swap it in. I managed to find a NEO motor for a good price and decided to have a crack. It turned out to be pretty straightforward and runs great. The old motor. I didn't place the rod like this, when I took off the sump it greeted me NEO waiting to go in There's been a bit of discussion that I've found in a few threads in this forum about what you need to do to get a NEO motor into an R33, and specifically if you were going to use the R33 (in my case a series 2) intake and exhaust manifolds. I'm going to list here what I did to get this to work. Hint: it wasn't much. HERE IS WHAT I DID TO GET A NEO MOTOR IN MY R33 USING THE INTAKE AND EXHAUST FROM A SERIES 2 MOTOR: You must swap the VCT Solenoid plug to the "New Nissan" style. I got mine from EFI Solutions here. Old plug won't fit the NEO solenoid New plug was straightforward to wire. Pro tip: make sure you get the right crimp tool (you need one that does non insulated crimps) You need to swap the CAS wiring if you have the old style metal-cased CAS. (I was lucky, as I have a 40th anniversary R33, my CAS is the same as the NEO CAS, so no change needed). My understanding is the wiring is reversed, but check yourself. I used all accessories from the S2 motor. All brackets fit without modification. I used the S2 Harmonic Balancer, as it has a 2-rib design which matches the power steering pump pulley from the S2 I swapped the entire intake. On the head there are 2 studs for the intake manifold, 1 on either end, to mount the intake along with the bolts. I used the S2 studs as they match the manifold. The ones in the NEO weren't long enough. I was informed that the NEO head has smaller ports. When I did a direct comparison, the difference was basically negligible, and the intake gasket part number is the same between S2 and NEO, so it can't be that different. Nonetheless I did some very slight porting with a die grinder and I haven't noticed an issue. I swapped the exhaust manifold, turbo, etc and it was a direct swap. I added NEO Splitfire Coilpacks - these mount differently than S2 so I couldn't reuse my originals ones, in the NEO they mount directly to the head and not via brackets as seen in the S2. I used my S2 flywheel but they are the same as NEO I swapped to my S2 valve and valley covers, they were a direct swap. This wasn't a must-have. I used the timing belt cover and back plate from the S2 motor On the NEO, the timing belt back plate has a hose that you don't need. Although not a must-do, I swapped to my S2 back plate and cover. I used the S2 thermostat housing The NEO housing is a smaller diameter and overall different dimensions. You could use it find but would need to find the right hose. I simply swapped to S2 and it was bolt on. All cooling and vacuum hoses swapped over without modification Added S2 engine mount brackets These are the same as NEO but new motor didn't come with them. I think this is everything really. There honestly wasn't much to it, when I got everything plumbed it fired up without issue and without touching tune. The biggest change for me was a VCT plug which was nothing, then it was just little bits to make sure it all goes together nicely. As for the end result, you can see a comparison below along with some pics. I did all of this in my driveway basically solo Old motor, RB25DET S2, 238xxx kms. ARP Studs, Cometic HG, Kelford Springs, Hypergear G3 21U, E85 - 300.4 rwkw New motor, RB25DET NEO, 250xxx kms, ARP studs, Hypergear G3 21U, E85 - 310.8 rwkw It wasn't fun in a cold a dusty driveway covered by bunnings gazebos New motor coming together. New water pump, pulleys and belt Motor in the car I hope this provides some useful info and helps some of you. Cheers. Josh.
    7 points
  3. Heat wrap turned up on Thursday so I got to work on Friday and wrapped the dump up. Didnt get any time to put it in yesterday, had to keep the boss happy and get her some stuff. Installed a new clothes line for her so she can dry my clothes πŸ˜‚ Good for painting parts too. Today put the gate and screamer on and plumbed all the lines and hoses back up and put her all back together πŸ’ͺ Had to get a fix so went for a quick spin to see how the new mani goes. 2nd pull I saw 22psi on the dash which is amazing. Hopefully I was full throttle but definitely better than the 30psi it was before! Single gate sounds mint too. Hopefully get her on the dyno soon and give her a tuneup and get these pumps staged as well. 20210725_154021.mp4
    6 points
  4. Quoting this just to make sure it doesn't go away.
    6 points
  5. Got back to Brissy on Saturday arvo. Had a nice morning drive down Fraser. Could nice photos. On nightshift this week so went and picked up mani and pipes yesterday and spent a few hours putting it all back together. Came up pretty good, i just need to get a new radiator setup and paint it black as well πŸ˜‚ Everythings back on except dump pipe and gate/screamer now. Have to wait until the heat wrap arrives that I ordered. Have new crimpers coming to terminate my pressure sensor plugs so need to wait for them before I can finish wiring emap up. So cars not far off running, ill probably just wait until I get the a/c relo and p/s pulley before I do drive it around. Will have to dump the p/s fluid and pull the pump off so I can change the pulleys and while thats out will give me better access to the a/c compressor. Fingers crossed everything arrives for me this week 😬
    5 points
  6. The race continues to be ready for tuning, putting the car back together. Here is a bit of a look at the brand new replacement outer sills that have been replaced on both sides. Just about to put the freshly painted sideskirts on after fitting new front inner guardliners and new series 2 rear mudguards - I have a mountain of genuine Nissan clips and bolts for the jobs ahead. Doors were also removed as part of the paint job and realigned. With new strikers they shut perfectly now, as they were shocking before. As you can see I'm a bit shit at taking photos though
    5 points
  7. Disclaimer: everything I do only makes sense to the voices in my head
    4 points
  8. Currently on holiday up on Fraser drinking beer and catching fish πŸ‘Œ Ripped the car back apart a couple weeks ago and sent it off to be coated. Should look sweet when i get it back in. Ill pick it up on Monday when I'm back in Brissy and start putting it all back together. Also have a new set of coilovers lined up that I'll pick up at some stage. Going to be on the hunt for a gtr diff/axle setup as well if anyone knows/is selling one. Probably end up putting it on the rollers and setting up the staged pumps and see what boost the new manifold setup gives us. Once we're ready for power runs we'll put it on the hub and see what she will push out πŸ’ͺ
    4 points
  9. Now....that's not quite true. PranK is always nice. I'm frequently grumpy.
    3 points
  10. Or beat it off. If I wasnt in lockdown I could help you beat it off.
    3 points
  11. 3 points
  12. A while back I purchased a lot of aluminum exhaust parts to one day put a full time full exhaust on the car. The main reason was safety. I had seen a couple open header cars at the track put oil under the tires from engine damage and wreck. Now that I'm going to start pushing this motor harder I would rather eat the power loss for the sake of safety. The reason for choosing aluminum was for the weight and the low cost compared to stainless. The Promod guys use aluminum and I've done an aluminum downpipe on another car before and it worked well. The downpipe material is all schedule 11 and the exhaust portion will be schedule 14. The schedule 14 will start where the factory cat normally sits. This is to make all significant bends from schedule 11. The downpipe is 5" and tapers to 4" for the exhaust. A couple things I wanted to change from my last design: wideband sensor must be accessible from the engine bay for quick changes on the roadside or at the track. Downpipe needs to come out for turbo removal so this must also be able to be done from the engine bay with no jacks/lift. I want to be able to remove the turbo quickly at any location should the need arise. This is the reason for the v-band partway down the downpipe. The exhaust will be mounted to the mounting ear on the transmission and hopefully that will hold it well enough to R&R the upper downpipe section without getting under the car. Downpipe all welded. I'm not a pro at welding but certainly seem to be improving. In the car From underneath
    3 points
  13. Stop spreading covid then πŸ˜πŸ˜‚
    3 points
  14. ^^ that's a PCV seal, not a spark plug seal. Bad news I'm afraid.. spark plug seals on the rocker cover are not replaceable. you need to buy the whole cover. There have been some people who have cut into the plastic splash guard inside the valve cover to access the plug seals and manage to find replacement seals that fit, but is all very messy and easy to stuff up. https://www.amayama.com/en/part/nissan/13264al611 https://www.amayama.com/en/part/nissan/13264al601
    3 points
  15. Needs twins to be a GT-R, or be like Advan and put twins in a GTS-4, and put GT-R guards on it. GT-R with sunroof lol.
    3 points
  16. had to get some attention on the pulling jig due one of the workshops it went to using the tow point as a jacking point and bending it. It’s perfectly straight now though the they started taking the paint off the engine bay, the whole thing will be going back to bare metal
    3 points
  17. Why do you need to know these things if you're never going to do a burnout video?
    3 points
  18. Building an engine is at least 80% cleaning and checking things!
    3 points
  19. 2 mods today First is a GKTech Brake Master Cylinder stopper. Next a GHTech sticker for the extra 2KW! Just gotta drive it now to see what difference it makes...
    3 points
  20. It feels like the "only" option at the moment. I used to be with NRMA Vintage (they grandfathered my policy so had it until Jan this year) then moved to Enthusiast after I accidentally resprayed the car and accidentally cut/welded the guards. NRMA Vintage wouldn't budge from the $12k cover.
    2 points
  21. Ok the event is a go! Email coming out tonight with details and restrictions.
    2 points
  22. Only seems to be used by burnout and drag cars. Steering feel not on the radar, and unable to be thought about for burnout guys . They max out their brains quite quickly.
    2 points
  23. Put steering wheel back on. Put nut back on 1.5 turns. Beat the crap out of the back side of the wheel.
    2 points
  24. Fuel system time So my final parts pile consisted of: - Billet (BPP) top feed fuel rail - Bosch 1000cc injectors (+ loom adapters) - Turbosmart FPR800 - A bunch of fittings/adapters to make it all work The idea, at least for now, is to use the stock fuel lines and just adapt all these aftermarket bits to hook up to them. So even though the rail has a -8 size feed, I'm running stock 5/16 line up to the rail then using an adapter to go 5/16 -> -6 -> -8 into the rail haha. If I do go E85 then I'll need a new fuel filter as well and they generally have -6 inlet/outlets so my line setup would need to change then anyway. I set to work pulling all the old fuel lines off everything in the engine bay then pulling out the stock rail. The good thing about this forward facing style of manifold is that the rail was only 3 bolts and so I had it out in about a minute. Once everything was removed I put the new injector adapters into the manifold, popped the new injectors in and put the new rail on the top. I had the thought of also tucking the injector loom underneath the manifold and it makes a huge difference aesthetically, especially with the new loom adapters you can see sticking up between each runner. FPR getting set up with gauge Flex fuel sensor mounted down on the chassis/bottom of the strut tower I got to this point then realised the black paint on the manifold looked like crap... so what did I decide to do? Turned my simple single-afternoon-fuel-system-install into a week long process of stripping the paint off the manifold! I've never liked working with paint, thinners or anything of that nature... so my knowledge was limited but now I've got a good handle on things... and I think it came out really well considering I left it bolted in place! Now you can really see the different that tucking the loom underneath makes Rail back on The finished product I went into the Haltech and changed the settings to suit and basically fired right up! Ran great while cold... didn't like being started while hot though which is the opposite of what I assumed was going to happen! I'll keep working on figuring it out and also install my fuel pump soon. Then it's just R35 coilpack install and then off for a tune when money (and tuner's schedule) allows... getting excited!
    2 points
  25. I'll bet the issue in the switch itself.
    2 points
  26. Clutch <> compressor. Compressor could be fine. Probably is. The compressor and clutch are going to be common with other cars. Take it to an auto electrician, particularly one who also does air-con regassing etc. And how can it be hard to find someone is San Fransisco to rebuild a compressor? I live in a backward city in a backward country where we all hang upside down from the ground, with a population of only a million or so people and I can probably come up with a list of 5 or 6 places that I would be able to get an air con compressor done. You have SF (pop 1M, LA (pop ~4M), the rest of California (~40M), every other city on the west coast, every city everywhere else in a country with 300 million people.
    2 points
  27. Timing belt done. Not too bad of a job. Was like working on an SR20 cross RB. A couple of timing lock tools and a day of cursing the french and it was done. Engine lives on and no frogs or snails where harmed Horse shoe lock tool in place to lock cams in tdc position. A pin is then inserted into the side of the block and locks the crank in place. Overnight parts from ktec racing UK. No vat or gst paid. Stuff you Gerry Harvey. Old school way of finding tdc before cam lock tool and locking pin was inserted into the crank from side of block. Interesting story about that, later. The crank timing belt gear is keyed, the balancer isn't, neither are the cam gears. I was lucky I didn't have to remove the cam gears as the vvt pulley wasn't making sr20 noises and the cam seals weren't leaking. The only thing that i stuffed up on was putting the blanking plug back into the side of the block. There is another threaded hole close to it that is unused with the same thread and i put it in that. The engine had some positive crank ventilation for a day before i had to investigate why there was oil leaking onto my driveway. Quickly realised my mistake and rectified. All in all, not really any more difficult than an rb timing belt. If the cam gears needed to be removed, another lock tool would have been required to lock the gears together to undo the bolts. Still very diy able.
    2 points
  28. Got a nice little update for the car, been a little while since the last one. This time i focussed on getting the interior to where i want it. First item on the agenda was a new gearknob, wanted a new one but couldnt find any offerings that wouldnt burn your hand off on a hot summers day. We are Likewise recently released a weighted stainless item with a delrin top so I ordered that along with a new handbrake button and shift boot retainer. Next item on the list was a new wheel, had a momo drift wheel on there but im really not a huge fan of suede! purchased a Nardi deep corn 350mm in perforated leather with red stitching, it feels a millions times better now on the hands! Onto the CD player next. i had a double din alpine unit which was perfect for my needs apart from one crucial element - apple carplay. i have carplay in my work ute and have got that used to just being able to do everything via the headunit that when i drive the skyline the basic bluetooth functions get on my nerves a bit, so an alpine Halo 9 was ordered. Really liking it soo far, plus i think it helps further modernise the interior and ties in well with the IC-7 dash! I just need to get some make-a-bracket from bunnings and securely mount the heater controls as my car doesnt seem to have any brackets for the headunit or the controls! will be an easy fix though. Now im probably gonna cop a lot of flaming for this next purchase due to them being replicas but hey ho! got some Bride Stradia 2 low max reps in Alcantara paired with the superlow rails. first impressions are they seem pretty well made, quality of welds looks okay and they feel pretty firm in the car. theres a little bit of flex but im assuming this is due to the fibreglass construction... time will tell how they hold up. But i'll give an honest review in a few months time. And finally i decided to change up the engine bay a little bit. Ordered a stainless steel dimple die'd coilpack cover from modern metal and painted my rocker covers wrinkle black. first time using the paint so i should have probably tried it on something simpler first, but i have another can and will probably give it another crack later on down the line. Finish isnt the best but it will do! Also purchased a Tomei Piston oil cap and some purple dress washers and m6 bolts to finish off the look. (dont have a photo of the bolts and oil cap - will add that to a later post) Going to order a black radiator hose and potentially do a battery relocation to the boot too.
    2 points
  29. this is true..... it actually made 775kw when we said stop...... 775kw sounds really impressive 🀣
    2 points
  30. Started fitting optimisers, 3 down, 15 to go. Fiddly job to do neatly and keep cables up and out of the way/weather/off roof etc. Would be easier if being done before panels were fitting. Connected 1 and turned everything back on to make sure it worked first. Nothing blew up, didn't die. Stay tuned.
    2 points
  31. Did a bit of running around today, first I picked up the engine covers I had the powder coat removed and am going to have them painted after I decide on a colour then off to rams to pick the head up all ported and the chambers opened up and all the good bits fitted and valve clearances set also because I was told the Jun cams had to much lift and duration rams supplied some new cams for me Only kidding 😝
    2 points
  32. 2 points
  33. Prick lol... More lockdowns for us Sydneysiders
    2 points
  34. Been awhile since an update on this one. So after what seems to be an eternity of 14 - 15 weeks, it's back home from the panel shop. Just picked it up tonight- I have until the end of the month to put everything back together. This car is also now booked in for tuning at Morpowa on the 3rd of August !
    2 points
  35. I made 260-310rwkws out of an RB20 for over a decade. 70,000kms street driving and probably 60 or so track days, motorkhanas, Dutton Rallys etc. The engine only died because I was sitting in traffic and a coolant hose under the inlet manifold had a leak and it lost its coolant during a city drive in peak hour. By the time I saw the skyrocketing temp and steam I had to keep driving another 2 mins to not cause traffic chaos in Swan St bridge in Melb. So fixed hose , crossed fingers but the head gasket had a minor leak and after 12 months with a slilghtly rough idle when cold etc was only a matter of time until I was going to havea more severe failure of the head gasket so retired the engine. It was perfectly reliable at 306rwkws on E85 and 8,500rpm with 21psi in its guts. The TD06 wasnt the worlds most responsive turbo but its a 2L 6 cylinder that has no problem with rpm so I call BS to the only 2,000rpm of powerband. I think the std internals are strong enough to handle the power you are after, expecially with E85 as the std rods are strong, ditto crank and pistons. If you are going to rev it as hard as I did there is no doubt some rod bolts are sensible if you are going to blueprint the motor and give it a general health check and blue-print. I dont think they really need rods and pistons etc unless you have a turbo and a fuel that will take upwards and over 25psi On 98 i tracked it with 255rwkws. On 100RON I tracked it with a few points more ignition and boost as it wasnt so ignition sensitive so was around 275rwkws and on E85 it was golden and made 306rwkws and thats the boost I ran it On PULP (with Plazmaman and std) On E85
    2 points
  36. Still pending the full tune, ran out of time, ran it on 14PSI
    2 points
  37. SO This has been off the road since January, due to delays with replacing various items. In short, I decided that instead of replacing only the clutch, I'd replace the gearbox as well (previous gearbox was fine) because I didn't want to be in this position again any time soon. Also the T56 Magnum is a massive step up over the regular T56 in every single way, especially for driving and shift quality which is actually a bit of a big deal for me... On that subject though, the post mortem on the clutch came back when the new box was going in, because the slave cyl didn't have nearly enough room to do it's job due to the starter motor relocation kit/spacer that was in the bellhousing. In short, my old clutch was never fully disengaging - Which is the likely culprit of the early failure. This was machined up to fix this problem, to give the moving bits enough room to move to do their moving bits job. It took awhile, but I did receive a T56 Magnum from Mal Wood, with his short shifter, and a rear case (from what I assume is actually a FG Falcon) because it has a Falcon FG short shifter on it. The idea behind this was to extend the rear case, so that I wouldn't have to use a dogleg shifter handle, and could use a handle that was straight up. I also opted for his Model 3 inter clutch, which will do more than enough to hold the power given it'll actually disengage. The only criticism I read of this was "It drives too much like a stock car, I want a heavier clutch so I feel like I am driving an actual modified powerful car" (again on Ford forums). So yeah hopefully this will suit! I also bought a metric ton of heat shielding, namely this stuff. Header Heat Shield - Lava Armor Exhaust Shield | Heatshield Products And this stuff, for the rest of the exhaust Heat Shield Material - Exhaust Heat Shield | Heatshield Products And here photo sof it on the headers and pipes and such. I really hate overheating, I was hoping new fans (from a later Mondeo) and absolutely lowering engine bay temperatures may help with giving the cooling system less to do. I also really want to limit heat getting into the car from the exhaust (can you tell?) I have since learned since ordering this stuff that a better bet would be to remove my 25% underdrive pulley that came with the motor, given it is only running the water pump at 75% capacity. Given my issues only occur when I am at idle, on 35+ days, with the aircon on, for extended periods... having 25% more water pump seems like a more sensible idea. Also noting that: ATI make a 25% underdriven dampener, but don't recommend anyone use it ATI make a stock size dampener, that actually provides dampening (my 25% UDP pulley has no such dampening) GM use ATI dampeners on their own crate performance engines instead of a GM OEM item. The gain in using a 25% underdriven balancer is about 5-10hp. So yeah, it seems like a much more sensible idea to get the dampener that actually provides dampening on a notoriously non-balanced motor, then underdrive the alternator and look into a better power steering pump for track use, which are all widely available. So that'll be next, once all the stuff in this post is up and driving again, pending a new driveshaft for the new gearbox, which literally was handed to the guy to make up on his last day before retirement. What could possibly go wrong with that?
    2 points
  38. Finally got a chance to install the new clutch. Took some pictures next to the OS Giken TS3B. The DCS 9" dwarfs the OSG. Found the TOB clearance to be within spec with the recommended 18mm sleeve. Measured finger height on the cover for future reference. Not sure when I'll be able to go to the track next but I'll be using the time to break in the clutch as much as possible. All laid out on the table OSG disk on top of a DCS disk Thickness compare Holes in the floater and in the pressure plate In the car! Love the OS Giken alignment tool.
    2 points
  39. The rise in their cost has increased the parts prices, owning a few "warm" Skylines is the shed is like money in the bank If you want your stolen parts back Facebook market place and Gumtree are apparently the place to find them And with every man and his dog rebuilding them.......it's an open market for parts My mate is a copper and theft of all the older popular models is rampant apparently, they have some task force thing going on but I'm not sure of its success, the theft of old cars isn't high on their to do list I assume
    2 points
  40. Getting closer, but I did take it for about a 100km drive yesterday. The thing's a freakin' animal to drive with just my road tune. Still waiting for..... ...and the bloody SA / NT border to reopen.
    2 points
  41. Haltech flex fuel sensor is here... along with a Walbro 460 Also after speaking with my tuner I decided to get the PRP R35 coilpack kit... Hitachi coilpacks along with the PRP bracket, loom and their custom-made short stalks so I can tuck it away under the valley cover if I ever decide to do so...
    2 points
  42. Yeap, what could go wrong
    2 points
  43. He argued that till he was blue in the face and went quiet after I hit him with β€œdoes the Japanese vin start with bcnr33?”
    2 points
  44. 😭 I just want to know my trans temp and IAT 😭 As for tuning, I can barely log on to the interwebs, let alone play with that black magic tuning thing I can see it now. "I am going to try tuning my car"........NEK MINNIT.......
    2 points
  45. I love the car and jealous of how much progress you seem to make, takes me 6 months to make a decision let alone get it done smh πŸ˜…
    2 points
  46. What information do you need that you don't currently have? ODBII can be done via a phone app in a far easier way, provided the LS ECU actually has transmission temperature sensors/readings that are transmissable that way. (I know IAT is) I also know your IAT reading will be inaccurate. I also know it will be messing with your tune/AFR as a result of it. Its cool like that, assuming you have the stock sensor now that you have boost
    2 points
  47. If your sparky can't fix that with a depinning tool, a spray can of CO contact cleaner, a toothbrush, and at worst a handful of replacement crimp terminals, then sack him and find someone who actually knows what they are doing.
    2 points
  48. How dare you use logic to fight stupid...
    2 points
  49. Ok I thought I'd finally put the last nail in the coffin regarding the BM57 R33 GTR master cylinder plug. As mentioned this is quite a common plug used across heaps of cars as mentioned like the Patrols, Pulsars, Infinitis - hell I even looked at our 2001 WRX and found this: Yes, the Subaru connector is the same. The problem is if you want a new one, Subaru or Nissan cannot get you one. Now as I referenced earlier the Ford Fiesta 2014 - 2016 appeared to be the same but even better, could actually be ordered as a spare part WPT-1385 through Ford's Motorcraft arm. So after looking around I couldn't find it in Australia, so I ordered 2 of the Ford Motorcraft WPT-1385 connectors from the US. I am happy to report that it is indeed the exact the connector you need for conversion to the BCNR33 BM57 master cylinder and have since fitted to the 32. I know it might be trivial to some people as you can just disconnect it and the low level brake fluid light will never come on, as the sensor contacts are open when fluid is normal and is actually normally closed when low / dry. I'm happy now πŸ‘
    2 points
  50. Hi all, This may seem like a relatively easy thing to do, but I have just finished changing mine out and had a ridiculously hard time removing the lines. For anyone wanting to save a few bucks and change it out themselves I just thought this could help them out with this thread. This will be aimed at an R34 rb25det neo, but it's all pretty much the same. (will update with pictures later) Parts required: Ryco Z201 Time taken: Allow 1/2 hour Tools: 1/4 driver ratchet with 10 and 13mm socket Phillips head screwdriver Flat head screw driver Multigrips Vice (can be done without, but EXTREMELY useful) 7/16 or 11/12/13 mm open ended spanner (not needed, but makes the job easier) Rags or container Torch/Light Park the car in a garage/shady spot where you will do the work. Let the car cool unless you want to get burnt (dunno maybe you're into that kind of stuff). Step 1 - Depressurize the fuel system. Inside the drivers kick panel is a fuse pack, revealed by lifting a tab and taking out a rectangular plastic panel. In the top row of the fuses there should be 10 | 10 | 10 | 15 amp fuses. Using needle nose pliers, remove the 15A fuse (should be the one closest to the door). This is the fuse for the fuel pump. Once removed, try to start the car. If it starts, let it run and splutter out, then try to start again. This is just allowing the injectors to inject the remaining high pressure fuel in the system so when you remove the filter there isn't any chance of hydraulic injection. Step 2 - Isolate the car This step isn't absolutely required, but you are working in close proximity and will be leaning over close to the battery. If you don't mind losing your programmed radio stations, it would be a good idea for piece of mind. Step 3 - Removal of the filter I tried just removing the hose clamps from around the filter in/out lines, but if it hasn't been changed in a long time like mine - best of luck to you - I had to wrench the puppy in a vice, which showed that I had no chance while it was still in the car. After long periods of time the rubber retains it's shape where the clamp is, and makes it super tight. Locate the filter on the drivers side of the engine bay. From the in side of the filter, there should be a rubber hose connecting to a metal line via a hose clamp, using a 10mm socket, undo the clamp and let it slide down onto the metal line. Give the line a gentle yank. Not moving? Yeah, neither did mine. The easist way I found was using the 7/16 spanner, slide it onto the metal line and use it to pull the rubber up off the line. PRECAUTION: It will be tight, watch out to not slip and slice yourself on something. PRECAUTION # 2: There WILL be fuel in the line. Not much, but there will be. Don't have any sources of ignition nearby (another reason why having the battery disconnected is a good idea) and rags to clean the fuel. Option 1: Pull it off and use a rag to try capture as much of the fuel. Option 2: Place a container directly under the line on the floor and catch it on the way down. I just let mine drip, I'm a badass like that. From the out side of the filter, it will lead to a fitting near the intake manifold. Remove the clamp, and using a flat head screwdriver - pry it away from the fitting and use the spanner to pull it the rest of the way. Again, there will be fuel in the line. Less this time, but have a rag ready. Your filter should now be free with a line on each end. Take note which way the filter was sitting in the car (hopefully "OUT" was feeding your fuel rail) and what lines go on which end. Step 4 - Change out the filter Place the filter in a vice with one end of the filter where the rubber line starts in line with the edge of the vice. Doesn't matter if you overtighten it, the filter should be going in the bin anyway, Undo the clamp on the line, and using the multigrips twist the line to just free it up. Pry it off with the screwdriver/spanner combo (if it really hard to get off - using 2 flat head screwdrivers and the sides of the vice as leverage points may help. Just watch not to slip and cut yourself). Repeat on the other side, and replace the lines on the new filter - correct lines for IN/OUT, etc. Make sure there isn't any dirt and shit in the lines when you put them on, especially in the out side, as it will be unfiltered straight to your injectors. Step 5 - Replace everything Grab the clamps from the metal line and slide it on the rubber before you install it, makes it a little easier, doesn't matter what order you do it. Don't over tighten the clamps, remember when you removed them they were not overly tight. Remember to grab all your tools from the engine bay, and clean up all the spilt fuel, especially before putting the battery terminal back on. Put the negative back on the battery (yes it may spark, hope you cleaned your mess) and put the fuse back into the correct spot. Before starting your car, turn the key to IGN - the fuel pump has to prime the system (bring it up to operating pressure), so now is a good time to look for leaks. Just check all the lines that you tampered with, make sure nothing is leaking. If it isn't, start your car and away you go! Congratulations, you just saved yourself $50 from a mechanic. If anyone has any input, questions, advice or a better way of doing this, let me know and I can put in on here. Cheers for reading. (Y)
    2 points
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