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Found 25 results

  1. Hello guys, I picked up a nice little 2003 350GT-8 with a buggered CVT gearbox, I fitted a secondhand CVT gearbox but was unable to rectify the faults. After about 1 year of spending time trying to find the faults, I decided I would make the leap and convert the sedan to a 6MT from a 350Z. Please try and refrain from writing things like "WHY DIDNT YOU JUST BUY A MANUAL TO START WITH" etc etc. I don't care. The car cost me $1500 licensed and all, and 2k for the conversion. Still cheaper than buying a 350 6MT. This post will contain as many photos as possible as I progress through the build. This will be continually updated as I complete the stages. I have never been able to find out about mounting the handbrake lever, or the legalities on cutting the transmission tunnel out to fit the gearbox. I hope to provide some light on these matters for the next person to take on the conversion project. Removed CVT and threw it in the skip bin. Best feeling of my life. GOOD RIDDANCE. Removed the following; Carpet (needed a clean anyway) Front and rear seats Center console HVAC and anything in my way Witing harness Airbag module, Gyro & Traction control module. (NOTE ANYTHING WITH YELLOW PLUGS IS SRS AIRBAGS, MAKE SURE BATTERY UNPLUGGED ALSO DO NOT FLIP OVER THE SRS MODULE FROM UNDER THE CONSOLE, IF YOUR BATTERY IS CONNECTED OR IT HAS CHARGE IT WILL SET OFF YOUR AIRBAGS. IVE SEEN IT DONE. VERY DANGEROUS.) Brackets and really anything you see is going to slow you down. Mock fitted the console and handbrake assembly to see the alignment. Measured gearbox to the tunnel. Pictures of the handbrake assembly and how it DOES NOT match anything on the original tunnel, I guess you could make up a few brackets and cut some holes but that is dodgy and I want this thing to be as good as factory when I am done. I have a manual tunnel from a 350Z, I have decided to remove the inner skin that has the moulding for the manual trans and the handbrake that I require. Once done will be as simple as bolting it all onto the new inner skin as per factory. I was able to drill out the spot welds with a Spot weld cutter available for $20 its like a little hole saw. I have a qualified boilermaker / engineer on hand to weld the skin into the cars existing tunnel. There are A LOT of little spot welds not marked with arrows, the arrows are just pointing out a few of the ones I started to cut out. More photos and info to come! Thanks
  2. Hey guys, Thought I'd drop an update on the 6MT swap on my 2002 350gt-8.. On Saturday I dropped the diff, driveshaft & CVT with the help of a friend & only nearly killed him once with the cvt falling off the jack hahaha. Got it done in about 2.5-3hrs with a few hours prep I did the weekend before. Prep like drop exhaust, remove most of the bellhousing bolts, CVT clutch lines, loosen what driveshaft bolts I could etc. The most difficult parts were the little things really, remove this to get to that etc. Going through the CVT inspection plate to remove the X (I forgot what its called- between flywheel/torque convertor) otherwise the torque converter will still be attached and fighting the removal of the gearbox. Removed started motor, cable tied it aside to spin and wedge the X to get to the bolts through the inspection plate. Also removed the CVT dipstick & a loom bracket to get bellhousing bolts off from the top inside engine bay. Didn't have to touch the interior just left it in neutral to rotate driveshaft, disconnected gear linkage, was a peice of cake actually. I have a question though.. I sourced a CD001 6MT through this forum like at least 3 years ago for 1k before I knew of the difference. Is it possible to rebuild a CD001 so it has synchros like a CD009 or at least strengthen it?? also I've watched a bunch of youtube vids and I'm getting the impression that it's better to weld an open diff over a VLSD. Can anyone explain why this is please? Also have a 2003 350z VLSD I'm installing along with Whitline bushings essentials kit. Will measure up the driveshaft when 6MT & diff are installed. Next up is to prep the Z1 clutch for install, remove auto flywheel, rear main seal if required etc, solid bushings, interior prep, prep 6MT crossmember, install 6MT, short shifter etc, handbrake relocation(the cable is already right where it needs to be running through the tranny tunnel), clutch/brake pedal install then once that's all done scratching my head for a day maybe dealing with electronics hehe.. Just goto bridge the neutral safety switch and figure out reverse lights I think.. I'm going by this thread below mainly. But didnt even look at it when getting into the job, basically just unbolt remove whats in the way and drop whats needed. https://my350z.com/forum/engine-drivetrain-and-forced-induction-diy/552038-5at-to-6mt-swap-info-diy-guide-thread.html Yes I'm more than likely forgetting a lot, but it's pretty straight forward. Having my mechanic friend there for really helped figuring out the inspection plate X removal & with tips for getting more leverage/using the car to our advantage. Like loosening the axel shaft bolts with the 2nd spanner pinned up against the sway bar, removing the the driveshaft still attached to the diff as we didnt have the 8mm allen key tool required for the diff side driveshaft. ALL THIS WAS DONE ON WITH THE CAR ON JACK STANDS WITH BASIC TOOLS BTW...I'm waiting on an order from the USA- 'Never Ending Details'. DO NOT USE THIS COMPANY. They f**king suck. Barely any communication, Took ages to ship (nearly 2 months) and that's with me threatening them with a VISA dispute. Anyways just thought I'd add my experience with them. Pretty much follows the multiple bad reviews I've read online, same shit. The order was for flywheel/pressure plate bolts/various peices as it was a lot cheaper than going through Nissan (eg $17.50 VS ~$2 for 1x OEM flywheel bolt) I'm stoked the hard part is pretty much over. More room for activities now hehehe. BTW, the goal for this car is to make it into a nice street/semi drift capable car, with strut bracing/chassis reinforcement, coilovers, camber/angle mods & maybe a plenum spacer/intake being on the cards. Already has a mean sounding full borla exhaust & headers from the previous owner + ditch the wack bob jane special rims for some lightweight Rays TE37's. This car has been sitting for 3-4 years so I'm feeling really accomplished and excited to get her on the road again I will try to keep you guys updated. Cheers, Seb
  3. DIY Make a SkyLine (C210) Spoiler part 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QC1wtLY832s part 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qe-FO0U46ZU part 3 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efs-x8t-ly4 part 4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=byMXZZ1idxU
  4. R32 GTR Morimoto Mini D2S 4.0 Retrofit So after numerous ridiculous nights driving without adequate lighting in my R32 Skyline. I decided to do something about it. I reached out to TRS customer support and they began to point me in the right direction. I made a few additional calls to a couple of individuals TRS referred me too as they had completed retrofits on a few R32's as well. After these insightful discussions I boiled it down to going with either the Morimoto Mini H1 7.0 or the Morimoto Mini DS2 4.0. After numerous recommendations I chose the DS2 4.0! I placed my pre-ordered through TRS and waited patiently for these bad boys to come in. As soon as they arrived it was time to get to work. First of all I must say the quality and design of these are incredible, but they weren't going to install themselves. After staring at them for at least 2 hours and surfing numerous forums on previous retrofits it was apparent that I was not getting this done without hacking at my OEM projector. See the DS2 is significantly smaller and shorter than the OEM projector so I would need a bracket to step up to the OEM placement. What better bracket to manipulate than the OEM. I proceeded to cut the OEM housing leaving only the OEM frame. (Never mind the blocks they came later. Forgot to take a pic of the bracket when I first cut it) At this point I lined up the DS2 4.0 and used a punch to mark placement of the screws and created and cardboard template to determine what approach I was going to use to secure. I've seen numerous individuals shave the OEM brackets as thin as possible, trim, drill and separate the new projector to mate in between the fabricated OEM bracket. I chose a different route as I did not want disrupt what I assumed to be a carefully thought out design so I ended up welding blocks (about an 3/4" long and a 1/4"of an inch high) along each corner where I originally marked, then drilled holes, and checked fitment a few times, shaving each block respectively using a small level. Ensuring fitment between bracket and OEM bezel I must say final fitment is incredible! secure and as flush as OEM. Only one issue I caused myself was I forgot to trim the OEM bracket to allow the wiring for the high beam solenoid so I took a Dremel and filed away enough space to allow for the connector to secure into the projector. All in all I'm super stoked and can't wait to install on my vehicle.
  5. DIY Make a SkyLine (C210) Spoiler part 1 part 2 part 3 part 4
  6. DIY make Arch for mini with WordArt Part1 Part2
  7. Hi All, Anyone who has prepared for a Motorsport event should be able to identify with this! I filmed the lead up to my Drift event in Adelaide and have put together something i hope makes you laugh and shows the pains we all go to so that we can use/compete in our vehicles! it also shows community Spirit is alive and well. It took me a long time to put this together but it was worth it. OK enough blabbing here it is, I hope you enjoy. lol embed beats me every time, every forum has a different system. I tried searching in the search function, through google, used diff combos, can anyone help here and ill fix it thanks..Cheers Jos
  8. I've had a weakened door lock actuator for a while in my R34 sedan, meaning that one of the doors had to be locked manually each time, not ideal. I managed to chase down the replacement part from the wreckers and finally got around to replacing it. This is not a full DIY but here's the general outline, mostly as a note to self for next time: For instructions on how to remove the inside door panel go here: http://www.sau.com.au/forums/topic/285604-tutorial-r34-gtt-door-panel-removal-guide/ . That guide is for a coupe but sedan front door is very similar. Note to disconnect the window switch plug, push in the clip on the underside of it Remove plastic lining inside the door. Take care with the gooey black glue, it spreads easily and sticks everywhere. Remove rectangular metal brace from the door (4 screws) to give better access to the inside of the door end. Remove the bottom screw of the window slide/guide and jiggle it out of the door. There are a lot of mechanical arms (thick wire looking things) going everywhere, they are the fun part of this puzzle. Most of them disconnect the same way: At each end, rotate the plastic clip thing to the side first to release it, then pull the end of the arm out of the hole. Remember there are two ends to each arm – only disconnect the easier end, not both. The door lock/actuator assembly is held in place by the three large screws at the edge of the door where the latch is. To get the assembly out you'll need to rotate is slightly to get it out of the O-loop in the door lock arm coming down from the top. I'm pretty sure there's a wiring connector for actuator but I got over excited with wire cutters so oh well. Once you've got the assembly out you can replace the actuator only, or the whole assembly, depending on what you have. To re-assemble, follow the steps in reverse. Make sure you put every single arm back the same way. Test everything before you put the door panel back on: door handle and locking mechanism inside and out, central locking on/off, window up/down. Note that for the window to work you'll have to reconnect the window switch plug. It took me a while to work out that the window slide/guide needed to come out of the way first. Generally it's an easy job, just fiddly.
  9. Electrical Issue After Battery Relocation So I've relocated my battery and everything seemed fine key on engine off. Interior systems function with no issues. I attempted to move the car but after about 10 seconds of running my wipers started going crazy (not even switched on) and a cloud of smoke emitted from behind my radio into the cabin. To immediately rule out and prevent wasting anyone time this doesn't appear to be an issue between the battery and distribution block i.e. Short in the long power cable running from the trunk to the front of the car. But where the distribution begins and the power is distributed seems to be the cause. So this is the setup (see pic). I literally cut the three wires off the positive terminal, a 2 gauge, 8 gauge and a 16 gauge (approx) (see pic). The only difference is I cut out the 16 to 8 gauge connector that came from the terminal (see pic). Now this happens to also be the power to all the interior items and looking at the first picture the fuse that's blown. So in conclusion looking at the distribution block (pic 1) this is the only circuit of those three that blows causes my wipers to go crazy and burnt my radio up. Is there a resistor in that connector (see pic 3 again) or could this distribution block be crap? I'll take any and all suggestions please.
  10. Akshunhiro

    M35 DIY turbo replacement Hi all, Apologies for creating a new thread but I can't for the life of me find any DIY threads for replacing a blown turbo on the VQ25. Funnily enough the threads I have found refer OP to the search function. I understand a few owners have had to go through this heartache but has anyone documented it for use on this forum? Keen to grab an M35 and want to research turbo replacement as it's going to need it sometime down the track but sale depends mostly on ease of replacing this critical part.
  11. Hi all, here's a writeup on the recent oil cooler kit installation on my R34 GTT. References I would recommend the following threads and pages as a reference before an installation: http://www.sau.com.au/forums/topic/79130-r33-oil-cooler-installation/page-6 http://www.sau.com.au/forums/topic/462034-oil-cooler-orientation-trans-engine-steering-etc/ http://www.sau.com.au/forums/topic/461812-oil-cooler-recommendations-for-r34-gtt/?p=7658099 http://www.trak-life.com/diy-r33-skyline-oil-cooler-with-thermostat/ http://er34.blogspot.com.au/2007/03/trustgreddy-oil-cooler-kit-installed.html http://www.gtr.co.uk/forum/56507-aftermarket-oil-cooler-location-poll.html These might also help: Taking Off Gtt R34 Front Bumper With Pictures: http://www.skylinesaustralia.com/forums/topic/248385-taking-off-gtt-r34-front-bumper/ Installing Return Flow Fmic on R34 GTT: http://www.skylinesaustralia.com/forums/topic/288799-installing-return-flow-fmic/ R34 Gtt Front Mount Intercooler Installation: http://www.sau.com.au/forums/topic/348655-r34-gtt-front-mount-intercooler-installation/ Choosing the oil cooler kit Here's what I wanted from the kit: Full kit with a decent size core Good quality lines and fittings (JIC or similar) With thermostat as the car is both street and track Sandwich plate with spots for oil temp and pressure sensor too Prefer oil filter in original location if possible Prefer not having to bleed cooler separately when changing oil I ended up buying a Driftworks oil cooler kit off another member: http://www.driftworks.com/thermostatic-oil-cooler-kit-for-all-engines.html The kit comes with: Mocal 19 row oil cooler Mocal 92 degree thermostatic sandwich plate Braided oil cooler hoses Thermostatic sandwich plate fittings Oil filter adapter/fitting The Mocal sandwich plate doesn't have sensor fittings so I will need to use separate fittings for those. I am also planning on removing the original sensor sandwich plate I ran for my Defis, although some people do run two plates stacked: http://www.sau.com.au/forums/topic/402155-using-two-oil-sandwich-plates/ Installing the core and hoses The installation is relatively straightforward, just fiddly because there's not a whole lot of space to play with as the photos below illustrate. Have a good look around the front of the car to find and measure potential installation locations before pulling out the front bar. Generally the options are: Between radiator and intercooler seems the most common (if you don't have a FMIC you probably shouldn't worry about an oil cooler just yet...) Driver side guard Passenger side guard Some have even installed the cooler under the car, which may not be ideal for ground clearance, or airflow unless you add a shroud. Also consider any other coolers you may want to put in later; I installed a power steering cooler at the same time (in the driver side guard). Here are the general steps for installing between rad and IC: Remove engine undertray Remove guard liners Remove front bar Remove front bar support bar above the reo bar Remove reo bar Remove intercooler. I have a Trust turnflow and I ended up just loosening the clamps and moving it out a little sitting on a box because I was too slack to remove the airbox and piping.. Mock up oil cooler position! Use duct tape or whatever you need and double check the following: Sufficient clearance in every direction, also once the IC is back in place Can you connect up the oil cooler hoses? Braided hose doesn't like to do tight bends, luckily mine came with 90 degree fittings. Can you run the cooler hoses neatly into the engine bay? These commonly run under the chassis rail and above the subframe near the tow point. Do the cooler hoses reach their destination? Depending on your sandwich plate you may need some additional 45 or 90 degree Where do the horns go? I had to move one to the other side of the bonnet latch. Does the bonnet close fully? Again mine didn't at first so needed to move the horn again.. Depending on the size of the core, you can modify an auto trans cooler bracket or fabricate a new one. I cut the top part off the existing bracket and made small L brackets to securely connect the bottom part to the oil cooler core. Make a C bracket for the top of the oil cooler core and secure it to the radiator support part of the chassis. You may want to add a second vertical bracket too, depending on how well the bottom of the core is mounted. Before finalising the hose runs and tightening the hoses, put the following items back in place: Intercooler, remember to re-tighen the clamps Reo bar Front bar support bar Test fit the front bar. Does it crimp the hoses? Does anything scuff? I had to trim back the front bar vent/box near the fog light for more clearance between the front bar and the chassis rail for the oil cooler hose. Remove front bar again Make a support clip for the oil cooler hoses. I used two basic 25mm hose clips from Bunnings, padded P clips would be better. Test fit the guard liner. I had a to trim back a fair bit of plastic around the cooler hoses to get it back into place. Tighen and secure the oil cooler hoses. Think of the braided hose as sandpaper, and check for any areas where the hose may scuff the chassis or other parts. I cut off a length of clear hose and split it down the side, then secured it onto the cooler hose near the headlight and chassis rail to prevent scuffing. Once you're happy with the oil cooler placement, hose runs and clearances put the front end back together and tighten everything back up: Reo bar Front bar support bar Front bar Guard liners You may want to leave the undertray off until you've hooked up the cooler and tested everything For adjusting cooler hose lengths, turning over the engine to fill the cooler and other great tips, check out the excellent Trak-Life oil cooler writeup here: http://www.trak-life.com/diy-r33-skyline-oil-cooler-with-thermostat/ I've left hooking up the oily end with my workshop, I'll add here once I have the car back. Photos Mocal sandwich plate and core: R34 GTT auto trans cooler bracket: R34 GTT auto trans cooler bracket cut to suit the Mocal core: Oil cooler core mounted between radiator and intercooler: Oil cooler hoses test run: Oil cooler hose bracket: Scuff guards made out of transparent plastic hose: Oil cooler mounted: Guard liner trimmed: Oil cooler hoses in engine bay, these need to be secured properly once the sandwich plate is in place:
  12. Speaker never pushed beyond volume level 3. Loved having effects on the amp itself. Nice grungy dirty channel but crappy marshall electronics. Fixable though. Can hear dirty channel through headphone jack (not all the time though) but not clean channel. Was never really used because I had second amp. So when I tried to turn it on for the second guitar - no sound. Most probably resistor need replacing. Free pickup coz I don't wanna be a scrooge. Or just pay for postage. Located: Townsville Mobile: 0467003003 or PM me.
  13. Howto - Install Gizzmo Klite knock sensor on an R32 GTR Since these kits are only ~$300 on ebay (i used seller "globalautoco"), I thought i'd give it a go. Required; K-Lite kit including knock sensor M8 x 50mm bolt (Bunnings has a set of 4 high tensiles for ~$5). Soldering iron, multimeter Usual socket set, torque wrench etc 1. Remove/move aside the rear part of the wheel arch lining from drivers side front wheel well 2. Push plug end of sensor lead into the drivers side foot well from the engine bay 3. Remove the interior trim under the steering column. Find a +12v source that is one when the engine is on (IGN) connect the red to that via an inline fuse and connect the green wire to earth 4. Connect sensor to gauge 5. Tie all the wiring away nicely 6. Remove the battery, plenum intake piping, dipstick etc to get some room to move under the plenum 7. Find the front factory knock sensor (underneath and to the left of the 2nd cylinder plenum runner, on the top of the block just below the head to block join. Remove the attaching bolt 8. Thread the 50mm bolt through the new sensor, then the factory sensor, then bolt it back onto the block. Torque to ~20Nm. The factory bolt has a 30mm shank, and the new sensor is 20mm high, hence the 50mm bolt. I used a spring washer 9. Re-install everything and mount the gauge 10. Start the car and bring car up to temp with normal driving 11. Find somewhere you can safely run the car at 3/4 throttle in 3rd or 4th gear. Dyno would be best 12. Initiate the calibration sequence by holding finger on the gauge directly under ZMO of the Gizzmo print for 3 seconds 13. Release finger and gizzmo will count down 6 seconds (which it shows on the LEDs, indicating its about to enter calibration mode) 14. Run engine at 3/4 load in 3rd or 4th gear from the start of the power band 15. Hold in this state as long as possible until klite has finished analysing. The two analysing steps are; 1. Search for your engine's noise profile. It displays a sequence of red leds then green leds as it analyses from high to low frequency and will stop the sequence once it has found it. 2. Sensitivity analysis during which the LEDs will very quickly flash through green to red. Once these steps are completed the klite will flash the 1 or 2 LEDs indicative of the set frequency, which confirms it has been set. If it fails to setup, it will revert back to the original settings and flash those settings for an extended period. 16. Drive. klite will climb as you come on power, if it detects knock it will flick up erratically. You can retrieve the peak reading by touching the klite for under 2 seconds
  14. PranK

    Towbars Australia is a business in Nambour, Queensland offering cheap DIY fit towbars to the Australian public. Having only just recently received one of these bars and fit it myself I thought I'd put up some info about the service. The website is great and allows you to search for any towbar that fits your vehicle and then, in the case of my VW Passat at least, choose both the duty of the bar (medium or heavy) as well as what kind of ECU-Powered wiring I'd like. So, in my scenario, I grabbed a heavy duty bar with flat 7-pin plug and reverse sensors. Considering VW sell their trailer ECU for roughly the price of this entire kit (not including the coding to enable the ECU,) I'd say it's a bloody good deal. In fact, VW Australia had quoted me $1490 supply and fit for a towbar. And, don't think that you're getting some shonky no-name bar. All the towbars supplied by Towbars Australia are ADR compliant, they supply for Haymen Reese as well as several other manufacturers. Ours was a Trailboss and is a serious piece of kit. Installation was easy-ish. The big how-to document supplied said we 'may' need a right angle drill, that became a must-have unless we removed the exhaust as there just wasn't enough room to drill the 14mm holes between the chassis and the exhaust. This added some time as we drove around a few Bunnings' in the dark to find a bit. It also said we'd need to drill a 30mm hole to run the wiring through and add a grommet. We didn't need to do this as we found another hole with grommet that was not being used. Even if it was being used, it wouldn't take much to just run it through. Note that the kit comes with fitting support. If you get stuck, give them a call and they'll help you out over the phone. The wiring required some multi-meter testing to find the correct wires in the boot, but once they were found it was just a matter of removing the trim and routing the wires, placing the ECU somewhere and then running the power wire to the fuse box. All taps, fuses and connectors were supplied. The great thing is that for you folk who tow your race/track cars, they also have a fairly wide range of weight distribution kits and other towing accessories. Some of you may have been at their dyno day shoot out last weekend (Their business is also known as Nambour Exhaust and Towbars.) Note that in my 'complete' picture below, old Mr DIY'er over here put the tounge and ball on upside down which made it very low. We fixed this after hitting 87 driveways with it. Check out Towbars Australia when you need some towing gear.
  15. I'll give you guys the quick run down. But actually figuring it out is up to your own abilities. I assume if you own a gtr, you should know how to do some sort of maintenance, disassembly, or repair. List of items: Solder Station 3mm 5000 - 20,000 mCD LED at 30 degree - 45 degree focus beam (Green, orange, red, white, cool white) Know your LED specs! Forward Voltage, Forward Current, Supply Voltage Any of these LEDS are good: http://www.mouser.com/.../Standard-LEDs.../_/N-b1bc8... Next is your resistor. Below is a resistor calculator https://www.digikey.com/.../conversion-calculator-led... For instance, I used a 3.2v LED, 20mA, and we know that cars use 12v. So I needed a ~440 Ohms resistor .176 watt. It's safe to go with 500mW. The best resistors are metal film. They reduce noise (LED Flicker), better tolerances for voltage spikes, and higher heat handling. These are the resistors I used. REMEMBER TO USE YOUR RESISTOR CALCULATOR!! Good choices here (470 ohm 500mW):http://www.mouser.com/ProductD.../Vishay/CMF55470R00FKR6/... On each specific switch, as shown in the video here on this forum, there are rubber 'bulb condoms' that sit inside the switch. They're ass, take em, shit on them, throw them away. Remove the switches from your facia after you've taken it out. You'll have to unscrew them. Makes it easier, and there is a reason for this. Hide your empty facia somewhere. You won't need it for now. Plug your removed switches into your harnesses. Turn on your running lights. Get your red or some colored paint pen. Take a spare LED that's been wired with your resistor, and touch negative or positive to your contacts and do some guess work on the polarity. Don't short your LED out unsure emoticon Once you've found the correct polarity direct, mark your hot wire with your pen After you got the marks, I mean it's basic soldering. Red to Pos terminal, Black to negative terminal. It'll take some fenaggling to get the LED into the hole, but you'll just have to be patient. Use some epoxy or RTV to glue the led in place. This is to hold the LED in the correct position, or it'll bounce all over the place because it ain't got a condom. For the window switch. It's just clipped into the door panel. Pry it out gently. It's difficult to find the location of the clips so you don't break them. Took me a bit. There will be a yellow cover on the back of the main window switches. Take mini screw drivers and pry off the clips. Once you get it, you'll see a circuit board with a T3 socket. I decided to just solder in an led (after testing my polarity using the same method above). Take down with epoxy and good to go. Before your decide to snap everything back together and start driving, test out your switches to make sure they even work. Also, you can test the illumination. If you're feeling froggy, this is the perfect time to completely disassemble your switches and clean / lubricate them. I got rid of some electrical gremlins when I did this. I also flowed solder on the circuit board. Standard LEDs - Through Hole | Mouser Standard LEDs - Through Hole are available at Mouser Electronics. Mouser offers inventory, pricing, & datasheets for Standard LEDs - Through Hole. MOUSER.COM
  16. While my Bora is in a million parts I've started looking for other stuff to fix. I then leaned on a small piece of vacuum line and heard a crack and lots of airflow/sucking! The brake booster vacuum line is brittle as hell and needs replacing. The two replacement hoses from VW are $300 so I thought I'd see if I can make my own up (car's not worth a lot, its not worth me getting OEM ones). One end is apparently 13mm ID which could be a problem as I've only seen silicon line up to 6mm ID. This is the part that goes to a one way valve. Can I use fuel line? Can I get some silicon line? Can I just fix the existing vacuum line somehow (cracks seem to be only around the ends of the line and not mid-way.) Looks like she's been in a bad way for quite some time and that I just made it worse. Could I cause any probs by using non-exact hoses (ie larger or smaller ID)? Is it easy to increase/reduse size of silicon lines? Sanks.
  17. MikeR34GTT

    Heater Core Replace Hey all, Just after a bit of a yay or nay here, but this weekend I'll be following the mint tutorial on here to replace the heater core without removing the dash, before I jump into it tomorrow, wanted to confirm that these pics attached are the heater (1) and aircon (2) lines that I have to remove (and cover so stuff doesn't get in there. Ive already had the car de-gassed so I'm pretty much right to go. anything I'm missing here? The tute is for a 33, but I imagine it'd be relatively the same
  18. Speaker never pushed beyond volume level 3. Loved having effects on the amp itself. Nice grungy dirty channel but crappy marshall electronics. Fixable though. Can hear dirty channel through headphone jack (not all the time though) but not clean channel. Was never really used because I had second amp. So when I tried to turn it on for the second guitar - no sound. Most probably resistor need replacing. Free pickup coz I don't wanna be a scrooge. Or just pay for postage. Located: Townsville Mobile: 0467003003 or PM me.
  19. PranK

    DIY OBD Display Hi All, So, my Bora uses an OBD2 protocol that is quite rare and most commercial scanners, displays and tools don't support it. Its KW 1281 and its an Audi/VW protocol. I can get it to work with laptop software (VAGCom) but I want some small display in the car so I can monitor some things that I have fixed to confirm they are no longer a problem (mainly cooling / water temp.) I have found a few DIY arduino-based solutions which I might try. Heres one; http://dduino.blogspot.com.au/2013/04/obduino-project.html Have any of you guys made one of these? To add support for a different protocol is that likely to be a code change or hardware? Or, is anybody aware of another cut-price solution for a display like this? Thanks all.
  20. Removing an rb25de/det + gearbox Before I get any heroes, leave your negativity with your huge ego ay what do i need? - a simple but detailed explanation of how to remove an rb25de/det + gearbox. but anyway, hopefully this is an easy one for yous I searched, read, and googled a lot. But, I haven't the right forums or a detailed enough explanation to run with. So, what im asking is if there is anyone on here that believes that they 'know' the best/right way of removing an rb25de/det engine + gearbox. This will a first time experiencing removing an engine plus box so the more detailed and well explained tutorial the smoother this process will go. I have watched a lot of videos, which has covered a lot of steps to remove an engine. Though It seems almost no one does it the same way, some people remove a lot of components where some only remove 'the basics'. Watching lots of different videos and reading stacks of information is pretty overwhelming. If someone could post a thread, find a thread, link me a thread/ video/ anything that you think would help it would be appreciated. what do i need? - a simple but detailed explanation of how to remove an rb25de/det + gearbox.
  21. Okay so first off hello. I'd like to begin this Build buy giving you a little history, before this I owned a 99 Subaru Forester, which started fairly stock N/A manual. The motor blew In that so I bought a wrx sti halfcut and transplanted that, plus a whole lot more. I then Sold that an purchased myself a very rough N/A R32 RB20DE Neo Had some nice extras (Genuine Nardi, Factory Cupholders) I then got into my first car accident and destroyed it. The reason theres no "Before" shot of this beauty is because I did not have the time to take one before totalling the poor thing. But it wasn't all bad because I got a fairly generous insurance payout for it, and purchased my current vehicle. A 1992 R32 Gts-t, This originally was one of the few automatic rb25de r32's to come out but has been converted since. And so we begin the build. The day I got her (minus strut brace) - had some ugly sideskirts and wheels straight out of Need for Speed. But there were big plans ahead. First had to make a Pod box to hide the filter. Next up decided to remove the sound deadening from the backseats, and boot (as it already was missing boot interior why not go the whole 9 yards?) Next up was interior, as it was already in pretty good shape I decided to try and keep it fairly simple. Got myself a sparco steering wheel, sparco quick release, nrg short boss kit along with a sparco shifter. I also change the ugly green and white dash cluster back to the original grey with purple led's I did the aircon unit and rest of the din area while I was at it all in purple. Also picked up some gtr seats which needed some fixing for faily cheap so sewed them up and put them in, much better! Moving onto the exterior I had big plans, slowly starting to gather all of the bolt on bits and pieces I'd be adding. This included the following: n1 vents for the gtr front bar gtr grill gtr bonnet with n1 lip n1 sideskirts gtr overfenders trust rear pods dmax roof wing dmax boot wing Slowly but surely I got it all together and began trimming up the fibreglass pieces and text fitting them. Got myself some new pipes made up and got rid of the cannon, (To Be Continued)
  22. I'll give you guys the quick run down. But actually figuring it out is up to your own abilities. I assume if you own a gtr, you should know how to do some sort of maintenance, disassembly, or repair. List of items: Solder Station 3mm 5000 - 20,000 mCD LED at 30 degree - 45 degree focus beam (Green, orange, red, white, cool white) Know your LED specs! Forward Voltage, Forward Current, Supply Voltage Any of these LEDS are good: http://www.mouser.com/.../Standard-LEDs.../_/N-b1bc8... Next is your resistor. Below is a resistor calculator https://www.digikey.com/.../conversion-calculator-led... For instance, I used a 3.2v LED, 20mA, and we know that cars use 12v. So I needed a ~440 Ohms resistor .176 watt. It's safe to go with 500mW. The best resistors are metal film. They reduce noise (LED Flicker), better tolerances for voltage spikes, and higher heat handling. These are the resistors I used. REMEMBER TO USE YOUR RESISTOR CALCULATOR!! Good choices here (470 ohm 500mW):http://www.mouser.com/ProductD.../Vishay/CMF55470R00FKR6/... On each specific switch, as shown in the video here on this forum, there are rubber 'bulb condoms' that sit inside the switch. They're ass, take em, shit on them, throw them away. Remove the switches from your facia after you've taken it out. You'll have to unscrew them. Makes it easier, and there is a reason for this. Hide your empty facia somewhere. You won't need it for now. Plug your removed switches into your harnesses. Turn on your running lights. Get your red or some colored paint pen. Take a spare LED that's been wired with your resistor, and touch negative or positive to your contacts and do some guess work on the polarity. Don't short your LED out unsure emoticon Once you've found the correct polarity direct, mark your hot wire with your pen After you got the marks, I mean it's basic soldering. Red to Pos terminal, Black to negative terminal. It'll take some fenaggling to get the LED into the hole, but you'll just have to be patient. Use some epoxy or RTV to glue the led in place. This is to hold the LED in the correct position, or it'll bounce all over the place because it ain't got a condom. For the window switch. It's just clipped into the door panel. Pry it out gently. It's difficult to find the location of the clips so you don't break them. Took me a bit. There will be a yellow cover on the back of the main window switches. Take mini screw drivers and pry off the clips. Once you get it, you'll see a circuit board with a T3 socket. I decided to just solder in an led (after testing my polarity using the same method above). Take down with epoxy and good to go. Before your decide to snap everything back together and start driving, test out your switches to make sure they even work. Also, you can test the illumination. If you're feeling froggy, this is the perfect time to completely disassemble your switches and clean / lubricate them. I got rid of some electrical gremlins when I did this. I also flowed solder on the circuit board.
  23. Binarydata

    R34 Auto Off headlights Hello, So today i modded my headlights to they turn off automatically when the key is removed from the car. I am doing this on my 1998 R34 25gt. It should be the same for the gtt at least, and somewhat similar for other models. This will make sure you cant leave your headlights on when you park only to return to a flat battery. (I've done this 3 times now) Tools: Soldering iron, Wire cutters, wire strippers, pliers, Crimper (i just used my pliers) Supplies: Solder, 3 horn relays. (i used jaycar part SY4068) at least 12 connectors to put on the relay tab (you need 12, but the packs from jaycar come in 8 packs.) couple of meters of wire Heat shrink First you will have to remove the plastic surround that goes around the steering column. There are 3 screws underneath. undo these and pull down on the handle that adjusts the wheel height, with this done it should just pop off. once this is done you will need to remove the lower dash piece. On mine there is a screw on the left and a couple of bolts on the right next to the bonnet release. you should now be able to pull it off, making sure to disconnect any plugs that are on the panel. there will be a bundle of wire coming from just behind the wheel under the dash then back up under the dash, In mine it was already cut open so this is where i attached my relays. you will need to find the correct wires that control the head lights. In my case it was the RED/WHITE wire, RED/YELLOW wire and the RED/BLUE But you should check these are correct. Best way i found is to look on the back on the indicator stalk there are 2 plugs, one has about 12 connectors on it, the other has 4. The connector with 4 plugs should have the wires said above and a green/white one. (Again your mileage may vary) Where ever you decide to splice into these wires you might want to cut the wire and extend it about 10cm on each side of the cut so you have a bit more room to work with. I soldered my little extension on the cut wire and heat shrunk it up. With this done i crimped the connectors onto the end of my wire and connected these to pins 87 and 30 of each relay. Now to get some power to toggle the relays. you will need some that is only powered with the key in the ignition. I got mine from the 12v socket next to the shifter. Connect a length of wire to the pos and neg of this and run it to under that dash (There might be a better spot to get this from, but i couldn't think of anywhere) then you will have to split this between the 3 relays. you can do this how ever you want. it should be pretty straight forward. crimp your connectors onto these wires and plug them on the remaining relay plugs. When moving the key to ACC you should be able to head the relays clicking. if not check your getting 12V on the connectors and that they are plugged in to the correct pins. it should be pins 85 and 86. Check that the lights all turn on with the key in the ignition. remove the key and the lights should go off with that.
  24. Up for sale is my Nissan Stagea Dual Sunroof Conversion Kit Kit Includes Front sunroof regulator with glass, motor (working) and sliding cover in great condition Rear sunroof regulator with glass and sliding cover in great condition. Grey dual sunroof stagea rooflining in great condition. Purchased for my 97 WC34 Stagea but dont have time to install. Asking $250 ono Inspections welcome. Located Doncaster Vic Can ship at buyers expense. Advertised elsewhere.
  25. Alrighty guys so this guide/ build log/ r&d will outline how i installed the entire cruise control system from an a32 nissan maxima into my 2000 wgnc34 nissan stagea rsfours type b. So firstly I’ll just state I am just a 19 year old who has absolutely no qualifications, just an interest in electronics and car audio with, in the big scheme of things, not much experience at all. Take all of this information as just a guide and your own r&d as who knows, some of the things may even be considered dangerous! I do welcome feedback and questions though! Prerequisites and Warnings; If you can’t understand how to read, interpret and follow a proper Nissan wiring diagram I’d advise you not to attempt. You must be competent with a soldering iron and or crimping connections If you don’t know how to use all the functions of a standard multimeter do not attempt at all You will have to modify the clock spring, which houses the airbag wiring. This is a large risk that can result in airbag deployment if completed incorrectly then there is the obvious risk of fire/short circuit if any electrical connections are incorrect or poorly terminated etc/not fused i will not be wasting time showing you how to take your interior apart. if you cant workout how to remove your steering wheel/speedo cluster etc you probably dont have the ability to install cruise control into your stagea. Step 1 Wiring diagrams; The wiring greatly differs between automatic and manual vehicles, with the latter being far more simple as transmission control is not needed. It is probably possible with autos but I have not investigated if the transmission control systems share commonalities. I have included both so you can see the differences. Manual transmission Automatic transmission This series of diagrams --cruise control wiring diagram.pdf-- are the in depth wiring diagrams showing all factory pinouts, wire colours etc. they are just what a proper wiring diagrams are. within these diagrams there are various notes such as this one-- what i did was print out the full diagram and white out any unnecessary automatic parts of the diagram to simplify it. i also suggest taking note in this document ---how to read wiring diagrams.pdf---on how to properly read these wiring diagrams and most importantly for pinouts, understanding if a pinout is shown from terminal side or harness side. Step 2: What you will need A32 nissan maxima parts ascd control unit vacuum motor vacuum cable actuator ascd clutch switch ascd brake switch (looks the same as clutch switch, just take both switches on the brake pedal bracket and the clutch switch) ascd steering wheel switch ascd hold relay ascd main switch (can get a usdm d21 pathfinder switch i believe if you want the writing on it to be correct and not horizontal) note: cut off everything with any plugs etc included and give yourself as much loom behind it as possible (atleast 100mm or so), take all bolts/fasteners too take the clock spring and all the wiring inside the steering wheel becuase it comes in handy if you want to incorporate a dash light that says "cruise" take the maxima cluster and connectors too stagea parts you will need a steering wheel that has the large D shape side airbag bolt covers with brackets housed inside. i think series 1 wheels are like this but im not sure what models come like this. all i know is my rs4s wheel is smaller and doesnt have provisions for any audio control (left side) or cruise control (right side). second photo shows said bracket the throttle with second wheel bit (think this came on most autos but again not sure) parts you can get from any car the longest fattest section of wiring loom you can extract from a car (you could go try and find all the colours in maxima wiring diagrams, but i just used what i had and spliced the colours i had in between the maxima terminated ends. consumables and tools 6m of 7 or so mm split loom a heap of double wall heatshrink of assorted sizes electrical tape thats decent your usual pliers,flush cutters, crimping pliers, wire strippers solder and soldering iron pin removal tool and afew of them in different styles the most dangerous tool in the shop (stanley knife.utility knife) t50 torx socket t40 torx socket 17mm socket 10mm socket but seriously does anyone have any of these? phillips head screwdriver and tiny flatheads etc parrot clip leads for your multimeter (the spring loaded clamp ones that allow you to lock onto wires/pins) Step 3: modification (guess you could say fabrication) in this step il be showing you how i (poorly) mounted the ascd vacuum pump, actuator, modified the clock spring, modified the ascd controller case and modified the brake pedal. Clock spring the stock clock spring in my s2 rs4s type b has 3 wires in stock form, (steering wheel side) brown (batt12+), blue and yellow (airbag) The connector on the steering column side of the clock spring had 7 male pins as shown in this photo, (ignore the pen markings) so that got me thinking, if there is a 7 pin input to the ribbon cable there must be a way to add 4 more wires to the steering wheel side. see 7 copper pins through clear window in clock spring. i then peeled the sticker on the face back to reveal the clip that secures the steering wheel wires of the clock spring. to remove this cover the two plastic pins that appear quite butchered in the picture below (top and bottom) need to be cut down with a utility knife as they are melted down larger than the id of the covers holes to ensure if the two centre clips fail there is no chance the cover can come off. they need to be cut down so the "od" of the centre squashed pins are smaller than the "id" of the cover holes as shown in the picture. once the plastic "pins"were modified and free, the centre clip needs to be squashed together releasing the cover. the next picture shows the connection of steering wheel wires to the clock spring copper with cover removed (stock rs4s type b). you would probably find a tiptronic series 2 clock spring has 2 wires you could use for cruise control which means you may not have to perform these modifications. thats just a guess though, and i choose modifying my own over sourcing one to find out if thats the case. next, i cut the connector off the maxima clock spring show in picture below to add to the stagea clock spring. i removed these pins from the maxima connector with a custom pin removal tool that is inserted into the front and the plastic tabs were lifted up, releasing the pins out the back. the wires were then pushed through the stagea wire black sheath shown in picture below and roughly bent to where they would be soldered. (top 3 blue yellow green wires) i then realised there would be a spare pin available so i pushed a blue/orange wire through the airbag black sheath for any future use i think of. the wires insulation were then stripped about 4mm or so, and all were soldered onto the copper pads. (see blue/orange wire second from right). only 2 wires are needed for cruise control out of the 4 that i added total, but i happened to have the opportunity to buy a rare factory option steering wheel audio controller and knew this would require one additional wire, and planned to use that final blue/orange wire in some sort of a scramble high boost mode button configuration on the wheel, hence using all 4 wires. Important soldering tip: pre tin your wires and pre tin the pads. DO NOT put excessive heat into the copper pads at any time. this will melt the delicate ribbon connector attached to the other side ruining the clock spring for good. i did one at a time quickly (tinning helps this) allowing the copper to completely cool between wires. the base of the wires were then secured to the plastic with a small amount of 2 part epoxy. i then pushed the three pins (blue green yellow) into the stagea black connector with the brown wire (horn batt12v+) and there the blue orange wire is loose coming from the airbag connector wire sheath. i then checked continuity between steering wheel pins and rear of clock spring pins and ensured there were no shorts between wires, especially the airbag pins! once i new the modifications were successful, the wire cover was put back on. some material needed to be shaved off the inside to allow more room for the 4 extra wires. once it clipped into place with the centre clip, i used the soldering iron to slightly melt the plastic "pins" ensuring it would never come off, slightly similar to how it was secured from factory. thats it clock spring done! ascd vacuum pump and actuator All i did was mount the pump to the same bracket i had my catch can on in the back passenger side of the engine bay, and made a shitty bracket out of some steel and aluminium that i had lying around to mount the vacuum cable actuator to. this actuator is on the drivers side rear of the bay. im sure far more elegant nice mounts can be made up it works for me haha. ascd controller case (mounting) i mounted the ascd controller behind the drivers side kick panel on the relay bracket. first thing i did was remove one half of the ascd controllers case by bending out the pressed metal around it. once removed the outer metal case, i drilled out the 4 spot welds without going all the way through, removing the factory bracket. i then wire wheeled both the case and relay mount bracket and soldered the 2 together. the case was then put back together and edges bent back to secure it. the photo below shows the final product once completed. brake pedal in my rs4s there was only one weld in nut/captive nut whatever you call it on the brake pedal bracket for the stock brake switch. there is a second hold there but no weld in nut. there is also only one contact for the brake switch and no second one at all. for from my limited research i believe all autos come with both weld in nuts and both contacts ready to go (no modification necessary) (photo below shows view from behind with welded nut, contact and second hole with no nut) to modify; step 1 crack a bleed nipple on a calliper with a clear vinyl tube over it going up to a reservoir/drink bottle or something to collect brake fluid. this is necessary because you need to be able to push the pedal to the floor. step 2: push down pedal with your elbow or whatever and attempt to pry out that little rubber contact you can see in photo above. step 3: get yourself a bolt and nut ( i used a 16mm long m8 high tensile bolt and nut) and steel plate step 4: put bolt through steel plate (if the plate is less than 2mm thick you wont need to grind down bolt head) and push pedal down and put bolt through the hole where the rubber contact previously was and put nut on the back. align plate with the hole where the second brake switch will go and tighten nut and bolt with pedal pressed down.(first pic is side view showing bolt-2X1mm plate-pedal-nut) step 5: this step will make you want to give up. if you finish this you can finish the whole install. you will need a mate with a broom stick or some sort of long pokey device to push the pedal down while your upside down in the footwell. get the stock brake switch and a second nut in hand. get your friend to push the pedal down to the floor and get up in there and put the brake switch through the hole and try and thread the nut back onto the switch from behind. you will now have 2 nuts on the switch clamping it to the bracket. do not tighten down yet. step 6: adjust brake switch back and fourth, with your friend pushing pedal in when necessary, with both nuts so you achieve around 0-0.8mm gap between the switch housing and the contact. to see this you will need to get a phone camera up in there or something. step 5 and 6 definitely are the most difficult, curse inducing, hatred building, case of beer break worthy aspects of the whole cruise control install. step 7: put the brake interrupt switch in and adjust so there is 0-0.8mm of gap between the switch housing and the contact (now the bolt head) see photo below brake switch modifications complete! see photo below for photo Step 4: The wiring So you should have gathered a heap of body loom or wires of different colours from a wrecker/parts car already. ideally you want to use the same colour as the diagram but as long as you record what colours you use etc you should be fine. il tackle this section in the same way i did in mine, one page of the wiring diagram at a time. i will often refer to "running pin so and so to a given location" and in virtually all circumstances out of the car this wire run was a 1.5m or so extended length i had soldered in the colour i chose to the nissan maxima plug if that makes sense. where possible to simplify wire routing i grouped as many as i could in the one run of split loom and when i new i would have afew wires going to the same location i used a drill to for twisted pairs or a larger twisted loom. i ran 3 main "runs" of split loom, one to the main switch, one to the clock spring and any brake switches and a third into the engine bay for the ascd vacuum pump. i suggest soldering extended lengths of wire for all "runs" to the plugs/pins you will add such as brake switches, clock spring connector etc, then running these wires through split loom so they all end up at the ascd controller area and final soldering is consolidated to one location after all other connections are finished. Page 1 of wiring diagram (EL-145 main switch) and page 5 of wiring diagram (el-149)/ "run 1" of split loom so this page for the manual transmission diagram only has just the main switch wiring and ascd hold relay. first wire: pin 1 of the ascd main switch. this is ign power and it is the same source as the ign power for the ascd hold relay. what i did is i found luckily in my scrap wiring loom, a pin that is the same as the pins on the interior fuse panel connector. i chose to do this as factory as possible so i pulled out the fuse panel, bridged the ign relay and traced out 10A fuse that isnt used with the continuity function and found the ign output pin for this fuse. the first photo shows that bottom row, 3 from left (white out indicator) pin will give you 12v+ ign through the red fuse in photo 2 with the white out on it (bottom row 2 from far left) to add the female pin to the harness side connector i sourced the same pin out of the scrap loom i had which looks like the photo below. according to the wiring diagram this wire runs to the main switch (which goes rhs of steering wheel next to fog light switch in speedo cluster surround) and also the ascd main switch (mounted on the ascd controller relay bracket) so i ran the wire off the pin back down the loom towards the mass of wires inside the upper part of kick panel (as a sub loom) then, as i earlier spliced a second wire into the long length (made a y split), i ran one side down to where the ascd relay mounts and one forward out the dash where the ascd switch goes. just incase your connector falls apart like mine did (dont fully take out the inner pin securing backing plastic on connector, i learnt the hard way) here is the wire colours and placement on the connector. the pink/blue wire is the pin i added that connects to third from left as referred to before and the fuse. now pin 4 and 6 of the main switch are both just grounds (pin 6 shows it goes to el-ill or the speedo cluster but upon further investigation its just a ground). i soldered pin 4 wire to pin 6 wire 100mm or so down from the connector and then ran the ground wire right down to where the ascd relay is (same run as the 12v ign+ pin 1 wire). pin 2 and 3 wires were ran down to where the ascd relay is and pin 5 wire was ran 150mm or so down the run of wires then came out of the loom as it were to go to the speedo cluster. now page 5 (el-149) shows pin 7 (speed sensor) and pin 13 (cruise lamp indicator) both go to the combination metre (speedo cluster) so i ran these lengths of wire up the same split loom as the ascd main switch wires, and had them come out in the same spot as the pin 5 of the switch to form a sub loom that heads towards the cluster. (photo below shows 3 speedo sub loom wires before i moved them 150mm down the loom for neater routing. a thicker gauge ground wire with ring terminal crimped and soldered to the end is then thread up "run 1" from the ascd relay area up to where the "Y" is that goes off in the sub loom to the fuse panel connector. this ring terminal is bolted to the common ground thats really obvious just above the large opening in the kick panel metal. pin 2 of the ascd hold relay is crimped and soldered with the ground (pin 4 of the ascd main switch), and pin 3 of the ascd controller to the other end of the thicker ground (down at the ascd relay to form one large common ground for everything. so this "run 1" loom, from ascd main switch to ascd hold relay/ascd controller" has all 6 wires from the switch, a ground and the ign 12v+ fuse panel wire thats splits off in the middle , then 3 split off to the speedo (pin 7 of controller speed sensor, pin 13 of controller cruise lamp, and pin 5 of the main switch the illumination). Page 1 (EL-145),2 (EL-146),3 (EL-147) or "Run 2" of split loom this will be split into 2 sections, brake switch interrupts and clock spring connector. all wires in this section run down the same loom Brake switches so following on from the first section or "run 1" of loom, pin 2 of the ascd main switch on diagram EL-145 when you simplify it, ties into pin 3 of the ascd hold relay, pin 4 of the ascd controller and also then goes off to pin 1 of the ascd clutch switch. what i did here is i connected all 4 wires together in one location down where the ascd hold relay/ascd controller is. the photo below shows run 1 coming in and hidden under heatshrink and tape this 4 way junction takes place and the green/black wire thats visible is now going off in run 2 towards the clutch switch. also in "run 2" a length of wire is ran from the ascd controller area to the brake switch area to connect to pin 5 of the controller and pin 2 of the brake switch. another run of wire is ran from the ascd controller area to the brake switch area through "run 2" split loom to connect to pin 11 of the ascd controller and splice into the factory brake pedal pin 1 (this is the stop lamp switch, sends +12v to the ascd controller when pressed like your brake light) thats it for the brake switch part. will continue the next sections in more comments as this is way too long for poor old sau and its lagging heavily (probably my crappy late 2011 macbook pro)