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Gym And Supplement Discussion


avrahan

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:thumbsup:

Though I'm kind of curious how rounded is "rounded" to boz. I have people come up to me between my heavy sets and tell me that I'm rounding my back, going to hurt my back etc. Never had an injury from deadlifting yet (it's actually fixed injuries for me) and almost everyone who says this stuff to me isn't lifting anything noteworthy with their deadlifts...methinks they play it a bit safe sometimes and are afraid to push their limits to get stronger.

If you are lifting at your true maximum weight for the exercise, your back will never stay straight during the lift...it's just the way the back lifts at maximum exertion. But as said before, there's a difference between rounding for max weight and rounding because you have terrible technique from the get go.

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It depends on what part of your back is rounding. Nearly everyone will round through the middle/upper back, which is fine (just makes it hard to lock out). Rounding in the lower back can cause problems but I've seen people pull heavy weights that way and never hurt themselves. I wouldn't teach it that way though.

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That's it, look at some of the strongest deadlifters in the world and many of them round, whilst others stay fairly straight. What works for one may not work for someone else; all about how you've trained your back to lift I say. Million ways to deadlift!

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That's fair enough then. I wouldn't want my back arched too much for lower weight volume stuff...some serious strength and form issues if you can't stay rigid on the light weights.

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many of the PTC deadlift videos I've seen have upper back rounding to some degree - the peanut gallery on YouTube is always quick to point this out too :D

Yeah there's one of Martin lifting 250kg for 6 reps or something ridiculous like that...63% likes because he rounds his back in it. I'm sure all the dislikers could show him how to lift more...

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From the very limited understanding i have. From what i can tell, Controlled rounding (actually contraction) upper thorasic spine is fine, actually good lever if significant strength is there.lower back stability is required. Zero movement . Lower back movement takes away hip drive and puts it under stress likely to farquar the posterior chain somewhere. If the weight is heavy enough. Including sciatic or piriformis in addition to spine hurt risk.

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Hence my response to Tolga regarding my 180kg lift on Christmas lol. Felt perfectly fine to me, that's all I care.

I dont think your lift on christmas and rounding of back go together.

I personally would put it in the category that Boz is talking about, 1rm, pb or not.

but, like you said, you're happy, so thats all that matters...

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has anyone had a car that was running really really well.. like the best it's ever run... right up to the point where it f**ks up..

and the conversations always go along the lines of... "yeah man.. it was running the best it ever did and then this happened"

Just saying...

If you are doing it in a dangerous way, it's only a matter of time.

Just because KK deadlifts with a rounded back, doesn't mean that you can too.

Troy you should go back and watch your vid.

you basically straightened your legs out before the weight started leaving the floor, then you did a stiff legged deadlift in sumo stance to bring it up.

Just my opinion man.

You know your body better and can decide for yourself.

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Not saying I won't ever get a deadlift injury, but as a back rounder I've failed a lift before and not injured myself. Have also held the thing above my knees for 15 seconds (very rarely) and hitch the prick up until lockout. It's not good form, but once you surpass that weight and it becomes light, you end up with decent form. Hopefully the day doesn't come when I'm wrong about my gut feelings.

I really think it has a lot to do with the way you train your back to lift from the get go. If you are used to lifting only rigid, then going heavy with a rounded back thrown in will see you in trouble; not unlike a hyper extension for someone who doesn't have the flexibility to pull off a movement. If, on the other hand, you have always raised the bar (!) by rounding with heavy weights, I think you are in a much better condition to pull off that style of deadlift.

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has anyone had a car that was running really really well.. like the best it's ever run... right up to the point where it f**ks up..

and the conversations always go along the lines of... "yeah man.. it was running the best it ever did and then this happened"

Just saying...

If you are doing it in a dangerous way, it's only a matter of time.

Just because KK deadlifts with a rounded back, doesn't mean that you can too.

Troy you should go back and watch your vid.

you basically straightened your legs out before the weight started leaving the floor, then you did a stiff legged deadlift in sumo stance to bring it up.

Just my opinion man.

You know your body better and can decide for yourself.

Agreed.

The lifters that have been referenced still complete a 'competition' lift, not something so far removed it shouldn't be carried out.

I think Markos says something along the lines of, 'Leave your ego at the door' when going to PTC.

You're only cheating yourself.

Also find this quote from you quite funny/ironic

Agreed.

Not saying I won't ever get a deadlift injury, but as a back rounder I've failed a lift before and not injured myself. Have also held the thing above my knees for 15 seconds (very rarely) and hitch the prick up until lockout. It's not good form, but once you surpass that weight and it becomes light, you end up with decent form. Hopefully the day doesn't come when I'm wrong about my gut feelings.

I really think it has a lot to do with the way you train your back to lift from the get go. If you are used to lifting only rigid, then going heavy with a rounded back thrown in will see you in trouble; not unlike a hyper extension for someone who doesn't have the flexibility to pull off a movement. If, on the other hand, you have always raised the bar (!) by rounding with heavy weights, I think you are in a much better condition to pull off that style of deadlift.

All this means imo is that you aren't ready for that weight yet. You've over come a mental barrier because you feel better for 'lifting that weight' 'getting that number' but if you waited a consistent couple of weeks, it would of became an 'easy' clean movement acceptable to the true form. Submaximal training is a powerful thing.

I agree with the second part somewhat

A rounded back that is induced from heavy weight is somewhat a buffer if they are still tight, if you're rounded and then lift with the same amount of breakdown, where does the spine go?

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