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SR20DET Vs CA18DET


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Hey guys, looking for some opinions!

Got an AE86 sprinter, currntly with a CA18DET conversion!

Now with the issue, the car has actually gone through 4 CA18's due to a number of things, but the last engine just blew up after being run a 7,000 rpm in 5th gear for a fairly long period of time! It burnt out the rod bushes on cylinder 4, basically screwing the bottom end!!

Just measuring up some options that we have now, which are to work the current CA18 giving it forged pistons, rods and a new crank rod, allong with boring out the oil wells to try and allow the oil to run to the bottom of the engine faster which we have been advised could have caused this issue! Also adding a larger and baffled oil sump! oh this engine is running a VL turbo pump with microtech computer and soarer FMIC running stock boost!

APPROX. $3500

The other option is to actually replace the current engine with a stock SR20DET and a small amount of boost! obviously having to change the engine mounts and exhaust pipe and using the standard computer! can get half cuts to do this for the usual $3000 to $4000!!!

What do you guys think would be a better option for reliability sake as this car does do track etc!! it runs great on stock CA18DET but the reliability doesn't seem to be any good!!

but heard that the SR20's have some generic faults as well!

which one would be a better option!

All sugestions would be great!

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You thought of actually reducing the rev limiter down to a more reasonable 5000rpm and tuning the car more for peak power at around there, to reduce the stresses on the engine?? Just a thought...

Especially if you are doing heaps of drift work, peak power isn't everything.

With the SR20DET it also builds torque a fair bit lower down in the revs, so that would probably suit your application more it sounds. Don't forget the CA18 is pretty old now.. whereas the SR20DET still has pretty good support in terms of bolt-ons from Japan.

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A proper rebuild on the CA will give you a fresh engine with forgies and rods for about 4000 or so if you remove the engine and take it to Roccos Performance. Theres a bokethere who loves CAs

An engine/gearbox swap to a SR from an S13 will cost you 4000 minimum (front cut) and it's still an unknown quantity. Plus you have to do the swap and engineer it and dick around fabricating new mounts and pipes so It'll blow out to 4500-5000 easy.

I'd go the CA rebuild unless you canget a SR engine that has a known historyon the cheap. It's easier and you will have a stronger engine at the end of it.

Just my opinion.

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The CA will probably rev better for longer.

The sr wont like bouncing off the rev limiter or sitting at 7k rpm.

The valve train in the sr has been skimped on compared to the CA. Unless u switch the GTiR pulsar lifters etc.

Have a read of http//:members.iinet.net.au/~sayer/biscuits/

or search for silvia australia, and read the tech articles on the pro's an cons of both.

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Rebuild the CA for sure !! If you get it rebuilt properly and balanced it should take 7000rpm all day long.

Those CA's make excllent power when pushed. Stroke it out to 2L's making it the same as a sr20 and watch the CA chop up SR's.

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Originally posted by GaryD

the other thing to think of too is the sr20 is a fair bit lighter. could suit the 86 a bit better? but if i was in your position id rebuild the ca

Actually the engines weights are very similar.

Externally, The 2 engines look completely different, and they should. The first obvious difference is the SR’s shiny alloy block, Next you notice the different inlet manifolds. The list goes on. Don’t mistake that alloy bloke as being lightweight either – there is that much alloy in the thing to keep it strong that they weigh no less than the CA.

This was taken from Nissan Silvia SR vs CA

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