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PranK

NRMA calls for ban on sale of petrol and diesel cars by 2030

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They can eat a dick 

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100% we are lagging behind. I'm not sure a blanket ban is the right approach though.
Maybe just some better incentives to buy fuel efficient cars or electric cars would be a better start.

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It's the way of the future, the logistics are tricky.

Ev requires E, so:

Hydro power- limited

Coal powered power plant- LOL coal, greenies love that shit.

Nuclear power plant- LOL again, but, with new tech, lots of small plants may be feasible. 

Where is all this E coming from, SA can barely, doesn't, keep the lights on at night during the summer, how are they going to cope with a couple of million cars on charge overnight?

 

I say enforce a sustainable population, cut it from 25 million to 8 million, and keep it there  1 child policy should set us right in roughly 1 generation.

My future policies 

E85 fuel at every servo, free beer on days ending in "y", 3 day working week, people who drive slowly in the right lane publicly flogged.....

 

VOTE 1 MLR for King of Australia

Jobs for the boys are a certainty 

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14 minutes ago, mlr said:

SA can barely, doesn't, keep the lights on at night during the summer, how are they going to cope with a couple of million cars on charge overnight

I'm not going to argue with the rest of your post, because it is all perfectly sound.

But, I think the story is something more like there were something like 3 days over the last summer where SA was not a nett exporter on the interconnector to Vic.  The situation wrt how much power is available in each state is in such flux lately that you have to keep up with the times, or your information will be out of date from month to month, let alone year to year.

Anyway, I'm not arguing against your argument that charging cars off the grid is going to pose a challenge.  I will go so far as to say, though, that with the v.large amount of renewables coming on line all the time, + some exciting new storage technologies (a couple of companies in SA using molten silicon phase change latent heat as storage, with massive energy density and no problems with cycling many many times) we may well get to a point in the next few years where we literally have so much power available that the prices could actually fall - especially peak prices.  In fact I expect the advent of storage to kill half the reason to even have storage (that being peak pricing and taking advantage of it by selling from storage when the price is high!).  Of course, any such fall could be perilous to the new (expensive) technologies that cause it to happen.....so probably expect to see a very measured and throttled addition of these things to the network.

 

As to the population decrease....I suspect it will happen naturally.  In SA something like 40% of the population are addicted to meth. With a little luck they will all die of cis-natural causes over the next 5 years.  The current tail end Gen-Ys and the new Gen-Zs are likely to be incapable of breeding because they won't be able to work out how to actually have sex from the safety of their own bedroom via a phone app with their gender non-specific girl/boy/what friend who is cocooned in their own bedroom somewhere else.

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In separate and ENTIRELY UNRELATED NEWS the NRMA are building a EV charging network.

Probably a great idea for all you inner city latte sipping hipsters but for us folk who dont live in a capital city things may be a little challenging.  What you need to drive more than 400kms in a day? No chance.  Hell we cant even buy E85 down this way.

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What is the future for mechanics?

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Im starting to stockpile internal combustion vehicles, engine parts and fossil fuels.


Btw MLR you get my vote. Much better choice than the current political fools in Canberra.

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France will not register any new IC powered cars after 2030.  All of the main car manufacturers are racing to provide all electric models although research into other alternatives continues.

China is already producing 100s of thousands of electric cars and they and their batteries will only get better.

Where is the power coming from? In NZ we are lucky to be able to produce all of our requirements from renewable sources but in countries like Australia many alternatives are being pursued. China  is producing more efficient solar panels and the energy from the sun (let alone the wind and the tides) is not going to run out in the foreseeable future.

Anybody who thinks that climate change will not drastically affect our driving experiences is living in a bubble.

Big horsepower (or possibly any mint) skylines will be true collectors' items!

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On 4/1/2019 at 6:38 PM, mlr said:

What is the future for mechanics?

You won’t have mechanics the way we do now. Clutches? Brakes? Transmissions? Almost redundant.

Throw in autonimous driving and people won’t need to own cars when it becomes a subscription service. Maintenance will be done by major corporates down some back blocks. 

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I think you'll be surprised. Clutches, brakes and transmissions are still perishable items. I get what you're saying though.

 

There are still plenty of things that break down and need fixing, whether thats from user error,, manufacturing fault, or fatigue. Mechanics won't be going anywhere. Maybe places that specialize in engines will see a decline in work, but not in our lifetime.

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6 minutes ago, Trex said:

I think you'll be surprised. Clutches, brakes and transmissions are still perishable items. I get what you're saying though.

 

There are still plenty of things that break down and need fixing, whether thats from user error,, manufacturing fault, or fatigue. Mechanics won't be going anywhere. Maybe places that specialize in engines will see a decline in work, but not in our lifetime.

We have eight electric cars now. A service is a $100 annual event. There are no clutches or transmissions. Well not as we know them. Using power regeneration to slow down means brake wear is minimal. Tyres would be the main consumable. Of course things will eventually have to be repaired. Mechanics will just have a different set of skills. When I was an apprentice I learned how to bend the spring retainers in the distributor to alter the  timing curve. Not much of that going on now...

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1 hour ago, KiwiRS4T said:

France will not register any new IC powered cars after 2030.  All of the main car manufacturers are racing to provide all electric models although research into other alternatives continues.

China is already producing 100s of thousands of electric cars and they and their batteries will only get better.

Where is the power coming from? In NZ we are lucky to be able to produce all of our requirements from renewable sources but in countries like Australia many alternatives are being pursued. China  is producing more efficient solar panels and the energy from the sun (let alone the wind and the tides) is not going to run out in the foreseeable future.

Anybody who thinks that climate change will not drastically affect our driving experiences is living in a bubble.

Big horsepower (or possibly any mint) skylines will be true collectors' items!

My sentiments exactly. 

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25 minutes ago, KiwiRS4T said:

We have eight electric cars now. A service is a $100 annual event. There are no clutches or transmissions. Well not as we know them. Using power regeneration to slow down means brake wear is minimal. Tyres would be the main consumable. Of course things will eventually have to be repaired. Mechanics will just have a different set of skills. When I was an apprentice I learned how to bend the spring retainers in the distributor to alter the  timing curve. Not much of that going on now...

Agree.

I think our way of life in almost every aspect will be changed in the near future. If we don't adapt we'll be left behind.

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The way I see mechanics going is (not a mechanic by the way), the actual mechanics will still be necessary, however the role they perform will change ever so slightly.
I see cars going modular and the mechanic will be more likely to pull an entire section of EV out and replace it with an new one. The component will then be repaired later (even off-site). 
There will always be a need for mechanics, it just might be that they aren't going to necessarily be performing all the same tasks. I also see them needing to up-skill in their abilities to interrogate vehicles via software (not saying they can't, just think it'll change slightly). Potentially you'll have the remote support desk who'll connect to the car to diagnose it before it arrives. 

Regarding details around European countries removing IC cars completely, i just don't see that being possible given the large distances that we cover here in Australia. We either need a way better charging infrastructure or for EVs to be capable of 1000kms in a single drive. They're probably both coming, but I feel Australia represents a tough environment to roll this out. 

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