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Wheel loading of OEM 18x8" V35 wheels?


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Hi all, I've just bought a set of V35 OEM 18x8" wheels for my car (same as in the pic). A bit of a curious question for some but what is the loading rating of each wheel (and not tyre)?

Each wheel has lots of numbers and references cast into it including "front" and "back" for fitment but nothing I can identify as a wheel loading.  The only other thing is that the front wheels have AL400 and the rears AL410. 

These aren't for a Skyline but as it turns out Skylines have the same wheel specs as several other cars (including mine) with the bonus of being lighter. I just need to get a centre bore adaptor. So the final check I need to do is for the loading rating.

Cheers

11092569.jpg

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If this is to advise an engineer of the load rating of the wheel so he can sign off on it for some bullshit technical regulation, then tell him to pull his head in. As Duncan ^ says, this is not a number that you will find available for almost any wheel. Therefore it is almost impossible to satisfy any requirement to provide that number.

A pragmatic approach might be to say that they came off a V35, and so their load rating is going to be more than sufficient for the heaviest variant of that model that rolled on that wheel.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks mate. They're for an early Toyota Kluger...yeah I know but don't laugh there's a point to all this.

All wheels have a minimum load capacities. They're usually (but not always) stamped on the wheel or otherwise available from the manufacturer. There's also a basic calculation on the minimum for each car. Roughly the maximum of all weights (car, fuel, number of passengers, boot capacity, roof rack capacity, as well as max tow ball weight) divided by 4. Another calculation is 50% of the maximum rated axle load more useful for cars or utes carrying heavy loads.

For the V35 is about 450kg per wheel. For my Kluger it's 565kg. These are the minimum and load capacities are always much higher to take into account bad roads, potholes, kerbs, etc. The wheels I have at the moment are rated to 1200kg and weigh 15kg which is why I want lighter ones. I have a set of Lenso's off a Skyline rated at 690kg and weighing about 9.5kg but prefer the V35 wheels. 

I expect the OEM 18" V35 wheel loading is between 750kg and 950kg but want to be sure.

 

Edited by Stratus
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Like I said, I've not seen published max wheel loads, and most V35 information is out of Japan so Japanese only. Perhaps a path is to look into any Infiniti G35 information from the US.

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On 6/22/2022 at 7:43 PM, Stratus said:

Each wheel has lots of numbers and references cast into it including "front" and "back" for fitment but nothing I can identify as a wheel loading.  The only other thing is that the front wheels have AL400 and the rears AL410. 

+thats a little weird. The same size & width, but different identifiers. Are they different offsets between front and rear?

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Posted (edited)
On 23/06/2022 at 5:11 PM, Vee37 said:

+thats a little weird. The same size & width, but different identifiers. Are they different offsets between front and rear?

From what I understand the rear tyres are wider (but the rims aren't staggered and offsets the same) and to prevent the rears being put on the front by an absent minded tyre driver the rear rims had a small stud. The stud would stop the wheel being properly mated to the front hubs. My wheels don't have the stud but they were on a Ford before and apparently easy to remove.

I'm not familiar with the V35s and could be quite wrong about the wheel differences. It's what I found searching online. Pretty much a wild guess but I was thinking AL400 and AL410 could be a clue with AL being aluminium (from the periodic table) and 400 and 410 a "gauge" of aluminium...  

Edited by Stratus
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No. The AL400 and 410 will simply be because one is front and one is rear. They're not the same part because one has the stud. The specification will be otherwise identical.

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I've never heard of wheel loading to be part of engineering cert. Can you provide any links? I'd like to read on the regs. Just curious.

 

There are so many dodgy wheel companies, that any government body that enforces wheel loading will put half of instagram wheel advertisers out of business.

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The requirement is set by the Tyre and Rim Association of Australia and is located at the Australian Standards 1638 Motor Vehicle - Light alloy Road Wheels section of their standards manual (see in blue). But there's a catch which I'll go into further below and is why it be understood this post may be incorrect. 

Australian Standards 1638 Motor Vehicle - Light alloy Road Wheels
Clause 8 MARKINGS; requires that Light alloy road wheels shall be legibly and durably marked as follows
:
(a) In a position which is readily visible when the wheel is correctly installed on the vehicle and without removing the tyre. The marking shall include the following details:
(i) The manufacturer’s name or trademark identification.
(ii) The wheel size.
(iii) The offset value.
(iv)
The maximum wheel loading for which the wheel is designed.
(b) Anywhere on the wheel. The production period identification, in sufficient detail shall be marked anywhere on the wheel at a convenient position, to enable the tracing of the wheel to alloy melt analysis and heat treatment records, i.e. batch/year.
The marking shall be cast into the wheel, or made by any other permanent method.

The catch is that the Standards Manual must be purchased despite being referenced by state and federal legislation or rules and authorities. Quote from the association's website: "Annually the Tyre and Rim Association of Australia publishes a comprehensive Standards Manual that is available for sale." 

The requirements are referenced or mentioned on some wheel dealer websites and some forums but these aren't the primary source.    

From the Vehicle Standard (Australian Design Rule 42/05 – General Safety Requirements) 2018

image.thumb.png.73d9beb5774dd243fce08a3010ce6973.png

From Vicroads (I couldn't locate something specific for NSW and didn't look for other states)

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From the Victorian Automotive Chamber of Commerce (VACC)

image.thumb.png.1cda3ecaa31a9c54116caa3393a3be22.png

 

Lastly this comes from a wheel manufacturers website (Ozracing). This may only be valid for aftermarket wheel manufacturers...

image.thumb.png.e8485e765b18ff90f054487171aedf86.png

This bit comes from the first part of the Australian Standards 1638 but the rest needs to be purchased...

image.png

Edited by Stratus
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