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Jason Broadhurst

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    BMW E30 SR20DET
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    Jason Broadhurst

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  1. I bought this car a few years ago, with the intention of re-assembling and having a tidy daily. I then had grand plans of a zero-kilometre, nut and bolt restore. Neither of these eventuated, and I’m now reluctantly listing this car for sale. Last registered in 2009, this car has been garaged awaiting repair since then. It’s been undercover and in a shed for 12 years now. The previous owner had started the disassembly process, which I have not progressed or assembled since. The engine has a bottom end knock so it was taken off the road in 2009 (until now). This is assumed to be the fabled oil pump failure. The vehicle has bounced up a curb and scraped the under-carriage causing some scuffing and crinkling. The good: 70,000 km – although who really knows with imports It’s very straight No rust I can see – happy to take more pictures There was a closed door respray in the past Includes everything for re-assembly of interior Engine is whole and everything is included Nismo 320 km/h cluster Near stock The bad: The engine has a bottom end knock No seats – I sold them because they were not OEM and in the style of vehicle No ECU Paint isn’t perfect No wing Side skirts are horrible and LHD minor damage Wheels are pretty bad Undercarriage crinkled in one section $50,000 Car is located in North Brisbane Happy to do video call tours, take in person inspections and take more detailed pictures if requested Contact: Jason Broadhurst 0428 849 062
  2. R32 R33 GTR Power FC D'Jetro - $1000 Brisbane R32 R33 RB26 GTR Power FC D'JetroIncludes MAP sensor Includes hand controller$1000 - Happy to get wife to box and postI can also provide a dyno or road tune, should it be required. Jase0428 849 062Nudgee Brisbane
  3. Does anyone have a jap brand exhaust they are looking to offload? I am also after a scotty dump and front pipe if possible. Am I dreaming to find this second hand? Brisbane, but will pay postage.
  4. So if someone can chuck that post above in to the top post, and remove brakes from the title that would be great. Also if anyone has some detailed photos or diagrams I could use, just let me know. Enjoy.
  5. Hi Guys, I thought I would put some information on how to change all the fluids in the car except for brakes and coolant, as it is covered elsewhere. Engine Oil Type - 5w30 or 10w30 Info - Depending on the climate, use 5w30 if you see temperatures less than or close to zero. Consider 10w40 if your engine is higher km Amount - 5L Filter - 436 or 455 Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF) Type - JASO 1A Info - Some people say to use MATIC J exclusively. MATIC J is just a Nissan names for JASO 1A fluid. Compatible fluids will list JASO 1A standard on the back. It is available at any auto store for about $10 a liter Amount - 10L Power Steering Fluid Type - JASO 1A Info - Most cars use ATF in the power steering system, and the Stagea is no different Amount - 1L Attesa Fluid Type - JASO 1A Info - Same as the ATF. Power steering and Attesa systems are just hydraulic systems and could really use any fluid in reality Amount - 2L Transfer Case Type - JASO 1A Info - Same as the ATF Amount - 1.5L Front and Rear Differentials Type - 80w90 Info - Front diff and rear diff use the same fluid. Amount - Rear 1.8L - Front 1.5L Brakes Type - Dot 3 or higher Info - You can use Dot 4 or Dot 5.X as they are newer specifications and backwards compatible. You shouldn't mix fluids, so if you are changing or unsure of current fluid, flush the system completely. Amount - 0.5 to 1.0 L Engine Oil Change Step 1. Warm up the engine. This helps the oil to drain. The task can be completed with the engine at full operating temperature or about half way. I prefer half way so the oil doesn't burn you and the oil filter is not too hot to touch. Step 2. With a 14mm spanner, remove the sump plug and drain the oil in to a pan capable of taking over 5 liters. Step 3. Clean the sump plug and inspect the brass sealing washer. If it is serviceable, install the sump plug and ensure it is tight. A 1/4 inch drive at firm pressure is all that is required to fasten the sump plug. Any tighter and you can damage the sump or plug on removal next time. Step 4. Remove the oil filter. This can be done by hand usually. There are also inexpenscive tools available for this which will make the job easier. The VQ25DET has a very easily accessed oil filter. When removing, have the drain pan under to catch any draining oil. Step 5. Clean around the oil filter sealing face. Open up your new 436 or 455 filter and smear some clean oil over the square o'ring seal. This helps you tighten the filter without it pinching or dragging. Install the oil filter as tight as possible by hand. Usually this will be 1/4 turn past where it makes first contact with the sealing faces. This doesn't have to be super tight either. Step 6. Pour 4.5L of oil in to the filler neck. Check the dipstick and continue to fill to the full mark. Start and run the engine at idle for a moment to circulate oil around the engine. Recheck and top up oil level if required. Automatic Transmission Fluid Step 1. Warm up the engine. This helps the oil to drain. The task can be completed with the engine at full operating temperature or about half way. Step 2. With a 17mm spanner, remove the drain plug from the transmission pan and let the fluid drain in to a pan capable of taking over 5 liters. Step 3. Using the automatic transmission dipstick neck, fill the transmission pan back up with clean fluid. Approximately 4 liters. Step 4. Remove the return line from the automatic transmission fluid cooler. This line is located near the engine oil filter and is the lower line of the two going to the transmission fluid cooler. Point this line in to a cleaned, empty drain pan. Step 5. With help, have the car started while watching the colour of the fluid coming out of the transmission fluid cooler. The automatic transmission pumps fluid from the pan, in to the auto, through the stall/torque converter and then in to the cooler and from the cooler in to the transmission pan again. If the colour does not change to clean after 2L, stop the engine and top up the transmission using the dipstick neck till full again. Once the fluid leaving cooler is clean, switch off the engine and continue to fill the automatic transmission until full. If after pumping more than 5 liters the fluid has not changed colour, the existing fluid was already the same colour as the new fluid and you have drained enough to have completely flushed the system. You should not drain more than 2L at a time without refilling the transmission back up as the pan can run dry. Step 6. Replace the transmission cooler line and secure the hose clamp. Step 7 Check transmission fluid level and if full start the engine and idle for 10 seconds. Recheck level and fill if required. A final check when hot will confirm correct fluid level. The car should only be driven if the fluid level hasn't changed after short periods of idling. The reason for that is due to the transmission holding over 10L of fluid. If you were to have an empty transmission and fill it with 4L of oil, the dipstick will show full but as soon as you start the engine it will be empty as the transmission has pumped it around the system. ATTESA Fluid Step 1. Under the steering wheel panel there is a small tab hiding the OBD port. Once accessed, further up the wires is a small 1 wire plug. Disconnecting this plug will cause the ATTESA override. This causes the pump to run when pressure is low. This allows us to use the pump as a draining method. Unplug this small plug. Turn the key to ON Step 2. Remove the right rear panel and the black compartment plastic from in the boot. The black compartment plastic pulls out from the top first. This reveals the ATTESA reservoir. Step 3. On the transfer case is a small 10mm bleed nipple, identical to those found on brakes. It is located at the tailshaft end. Using the same method used on brake bleeding, slightly loosen this bleed nipple and have the fluid drain in to a clear hose and a clear container. The clear hose and container will help you determine when the old fluid has been flushed as there is a distinct colour change. Step 4. While the pump is cycling or running constantly to drain the system through the bleed nipple, watch the reservoir and ensure it is not emptied fully. The reservoir should be as low as possible without running dry. Once close to empty, switch the car off at the key. Step 5. Fill the reservoir to the very top (well above the max line) with clean fluid. Step 6. Switch the key back to ON and watch the fluid leaving the transfer case. Once it is fresh fluid, switch the key to off. Keep in mind that you don't want to run the reservoir empty so it might help to have a second person watching the reservoir. There should be no air bubbles at this stage. If there are air bubbles, continue to fill the reservoir and bleed until all air bubbles are gone. Step 7. Fill the reservoir to 1cm above the max line. Using the bleed nipple on the pump, turn the key to ON and drain that 1cm of excess fluid through the pump bleed nipple. Step 8. Tighten bleed nipples and return dust caps. Step 9. Final check of the fluid level and return boot compartment plastics. Transfer Case, Front and Rear Diff Fluid Fluid type varies between transfer case and differentials however the filling process is the same. Step 1. Using a 10mm hex driver, loosen the filler hole first. This is done to ensure you can get fluid back in after draining. These hex bits can be very tight and full of dirt and grit. All this adds up to a damaged plug if removal isn't done carefully. Clean the inside of the plug and ensure the hex driver is fully inserted before torquing. Step 2. Remove drain plug and drain fluid in to a pan Step 3. Clean the magnetic drain plug of the build up. Inspect the sealing washer and if serviceable re-install and tighten drain plug. A 1/4 inch drive and a firm tighten is all that is required. Step 4. Using a pump filler, fill the diff until it is overflowing. This should be done on level ground to set the correct fill level. Step 5. Inspect the sealing washer and if serviceable re-install and tighten filler plug. A 1/4 inch drive and a firm tighten is all that is required. Front Differential filler and drain points Rear Differential filler and drain points Transfer Case filler and drain points Power Steering Fluid Step 1. Remove as much fluid as possible from the reservoir. You can do this by any means. Step 2. Fill the reservoir with fresh fluid. The power steering system (most systems are engineered this way) has an equal amount of fluid in the reservoir as is used in the system. Step 1 and 2 have diluted the old fluid and new fluid 50:50 now. Step 3. Start the engine and turn the steering wheel lock to lock a few times. This will ensure all the new fluid enters the system and is mixed with old. Step 4. Continue to repeat steps 1 through 3 a few more time. I typically do it 4 times in total leaving 3% old fluid (approx). Step 5. After a short drive, check fluid level and top of if required. There should be no noise from the pump or rack. A slight buzz will be heard at full lock, this is normal.
  6. I need to edit my first post lads, I have photos to embed. I posted it as a fail safe way to save it unknowing I am unable to edit first posts after 5 minutes?
  7. Power Steering Fluid Step 1. Remove as much fluid as possible from the reservoir. You can do this by any means. Step 2. Fill the reservoir with fresh fluid. The power steering system (most systems are engineered this way) has an equal amount of fluid in the reservoir as is used in the system. Step 1 and 2 have diluted the old fluid and new fluid 50:50 now. Step 3. Start the engine and turn the steering wheel lock to lock a few times. This will ensure all the new fluid enters the system and is mixed with old. Step 4. Continue to repeat steps 1 through 3 a few more time. I typically do it 4 times in total leaving 3% old fluid (approx). Step 5. After a short drive, check fluid level and top of if required. There should be no noise from the pump or rack. A slight buzz will be heard at full lock, this is normal.
  8. Hi Guys, I had a look around and couldn't find a guide on the Attesa system so thought I would throw something together to list all the fluids and their change method. Engine Oil Type - 5w30 or 10w30 Info - Depending on the climate, use 5w30 if you see temperatures less than or close to 0 Amount - 5L Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF) Type - JASO 1A Info - Some people say to use MATIC J exclusively. MATIC J is just a Nissan names for JASO 1A fluid. It is available at any auto store for about $10 a liter Amount - 10L Power Steering Fluid Type - JASO 1A Info - Most cars use ATF in the power steering system, and the Stagea is no different Amount - 1L Attesa Fluid Type - JASO 1A Info - Same as the ATF. Power steering and Attesa systems are just hydraulic systems and could really use any fluid in reality Amount - 2L Transfer Case Type - JASO 1A Info - Same as the ATF Amount - 1.5L Front and Rear Differentials Type - 80w90 Info - Front diff and rear diff use the same fluid. Amount - Rear 1.8L - Front 1.5L Brakes Type - Dot 3 or higher Info - You can use Dot 4 or Dot 5.X as they are newer specifications and backwards compatible. You shouldn't mix fluids, so if you are changing or unsure of current fluid, flush the system completely. Amount - 0.5 to 1.0 L Engine Oil Change Step 1. Warm up the engine. This helps the oil to drain. The task can be completed with the engine at full operating temperature or about half way. I prefer half way so the oil doesn't burn you and the oil filter is not too hot to touch. Step 2. With a 14mm spanner, remove the sump plug and drain the oil in to a pan capable of taking over 5 liters. Step 3. Clean the sump plug and inspect the brass sealing washer. If it is serviceable, install the sump plug and ensure it is tight. A 1/4 inch drive at firm pressure is all that is required to fasten the sump plug. Any tighter and you can damage the sump or plug on removal next time. Step 4. Remove the oil filter. This can be done by hand usually. There are also inexpenscive tools available for this which will make the job easier. The VQ25DET has a very easily accessed oil filter. When removing, have the drain pan under to catch any draining oil. Step 5. Clean around the oil filter sealing face. Open up your new 436 or 455 filter and smear some clean oil over the square o'ring seal. This helps you tighten the filter without it pinching or dragging. Install the oil filter as tight as possible by hand. Usually this will be 1/4 turn past where it makes first contact with the sealing faces. This doesn't have to be super tight either. Step 6. Pour 4.5L of oil in to the filler neck. Check the dipstick and continue to fill to the full mark. Start and run the engine at idle for a moment to circulate oil around the engine. Recheck and top up oil level if required. Automatic Transmission Fluid Step 1. Warm up the engine. This helps the oil to drain. The task can be completed with the engine at full operating temperature or about half way. Step 2. With a 17mm spanner, remove the drain plug from the transmission pan and let the fluid drain in to a pan capable of taking over 5 liters. Step 3. Using the automatic transmission dipstick neck, fill the transmission pan back up with clean fluid. Approximately 4 liters. Step 4. Remove the return line from the automatic transmission fluid cooler. This line is located near the engine oil filter and is the lower line of the two going to the transmission fluid cooler. Point this line in to a cleaned, empty drain pan. Step 5. With help, have the car started while watching the colour of the fluid coming out of the transmission fluid cooler. The automatic transmission pumps fluid from the pan, in to the auto, through the stall/torque converter and then in to the cooler and from the cooler in to the transmission pan again. If the colour does not change to clean after 2L, stop the engine and top up the transmission using the dipstick neck till full again. Once the fluid leaving cooler is clear, switch off the engine and continue to fill the automatic transmission until full. If after pumping more than 5 liters the fluid has not changed colour, the existing fluid was already the same colour as the new fluid and you have drained enough to have completely flushed the system. You should not drain more than 2L at a time without refilling the transmission back up as the pan can run dry. Step 6. Replace the transmission cooler line and secure the hose clamp. Step 7 Check transmission fluid level and if full start the engine and idle for 10 seconds. Recheck level and fill if required. A final check when hot will confirm correct fluid level. The car should only be driven if the fluid level hasn't changed after short periods of idling. The reason for that is due to the transmission holding over 10L of fluid. If you were to have an empty transmission and fill it with 4L of oil, the dipstick will show full but as soon as you start the engine it will be empty as the transmission has pumped it around the system. ATTESA Fluid Step 1. Under the steering wheel panel there is a small tab hiding the OBD port. Once accessed, further up the wires is a small 1 wire plug. Disconnecting this plug will cause the ATTESA override. This causes the pump to run when pressure is low. This allows us to use the pump as a draining method. Unplug this small plug. Turn the key to ON Step 2. Remove the right rear panel and the black compartment plastic from in the boot. The black compartment plastic pulls out from the top first. This reveals the ATTESA reservoir. Step 3. On the transfer case is a small 10mm bleed nipple, identical to those found on brakes. It is located at the tailshaft end. Using the same method used on brake bleeding, slightly loosen this bleed nipple and have the fluid drain in to a clear hose and a clear container. The clear hose and container will help you determine when the old fluid has been flushed as there is a distinct colour change. Step 4. While the pump is cycling or running constantly to drain the system through the bleed nipple, watch the reservoir and ensure it is not emptied fully. The reservoir should be as low as possible without running dry. Once close to empty, switch the car off at the key. Step 5. Fill the reservoir to the very top (well above the max line) with clean fluid. Step 6. Switch the key back to ON and watch the fluid leaving the transfer case. Once it is fresh fluid, switch the key to off. Keep in mind that you don't want to run the reservoir empty so it might help to have a second person watching the reservoir. There should be no air bubbles at this stage. If there are air bubbles, continue to fill the reservoir and bleed until all air bubbles are gone. Step 7. Fill the reservoir to 1cm above the max line. Using the bleed nipple on the pump, turn the key to ON and drain that 1cm of excess fluid through the pump bleed nipple. Step 8. Tighten bleed nipples and return dust caps. Step 9. Final check of the fluid level and return boot compartment plastics. Transfer Case, Front and Rear Diff Fluid Fluid type varies between transfer case and differentials however the filling process is the same. Step 1. Using a 10mm hex driver, loosen the filler hole first. This is done to ensure you can get fluid back in after draining. These hex bits can be very tight and full of dirt and grit. All this adds up to a damaged plug if removal isn't done carefully. Clean the inside of the plug and ensure the hex driver is fully inserted before torquing. Step 2. Remove drain plug and drain fluid in to a pan Step 3. Clean the magnetic drain plug of the build up. Inspect the sealing washer and if serviceable re-install and tighten drain plug. A 1/4 inch drive and a firm tighten is all that is required. Step 4. Using a pump filler, fill the diff until it is overflowing. This should be done on level ground to set the correct fill level. Step 5. Inspect the sealing washer and if serviceable re-install and tighten filler plug. A 1/4 inch drive and a firm tighten is all that is required.
  9. It was on the specs of matic J and how other fluids surpass it and are valid alternatives etc. Can anyone think of where it was?
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