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Robzilla32

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Robzilla32 last won the day on July 22 2018

Robzilla32 had the most liked content!

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About Robzilla32

  • Rank
    Rank: RB25DET

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Vic

Previous Fields

  • Car(s)
    R32 GT-R
  • Real Name
    Rob

Recent Profile Visitors

4,836 profile views
  1. Does it have to be a single plate? The Nismo Super Coppermix twin plate is very light and easy in traffic.
  2. Nice work. Although I am a bit disappointed that I cannot see the GReddy logo on the pipework...
  3. This one is better and you get a 180sx. Just need an engine and you have a GT-R: https://www.carsales.com.au/cars/details/1990-Nissan-Skyline-GTS-T-R32-Manual/SSE-AD-6258615?pageSource=details&id=SSE-AD-6258615
  4. Just etch "HKS" or "GReddy" over the rough bits. Job done
  5. Amayama have been my go to supplier recently for genuine Nissan parts. They have had lots of obscure parts either in stock or have been able to source from their suppliers.
  6. A few of your regular readers are kiwis... There are dickheads in every country and NZ is no exception
  7. The Pioneer head unit I installed in my GT-R will only display some menu options if the handbrake is engaged. I decided to be the one person in the world that did wire it up to the handbrake but it was a direct cable and no splicing required
  8. Noice! Love that fat ass enhancing offset on a 32
  9. It is well worth getting hold of a copy of FAST so that way you have a full reference for the car. Once part codes have been converted into part numbers you can search for them on Nengun, Amayama, Kudos, Patsouq etc as @djr81 has mentioned above. I have had the most success on Amayama lately.
  10. Is it not possible to obtain the part numbers from FAST and order them? Or are you wanting newer non-OEM manufactured equivalent bolts?
  11. Looks like it has been disabled already? I used the mobile app about 95% of the time so it's a shame that won't be available but it hadn't been working too well lately anyway
  12. Sorry to hijack your thread @Tenny but I finally had some time so took the plunge and started removing the sound deadening in my R32. I used dry ice only. A couple of observations: Initially I was being conservative but it was obvious after a short period of time not to skimp. If the covering isn't complete and thick enough, it won't cool rapidly. Be patient. Not one of my traits but definitely required. Wait until you hear lots of cracks. I didn't need to hit it very often. Cover larger areas if possible. It seems that the more you get to contract and freeze simultaneously the easier it is to remove. Makes sense I guess. So what do people do next? I now see a lot of bare metal that I was intending on covering with sound deadening. Do people usually paint or apply a waterproof sealant? I am limited in terms of space, ventilation and ability so the simpler the better but that raw looking metal makes me nervous. Thanks Rob
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